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KARRAGULLEN SCHOOL HISTORY     UPDATED AUGUST 2017 Research by Gordon Freegard
KARRAGULLEN SCHOOL CLOSES
A PERSONAL VIEW
By Noni Tenhave
ON BEING A KARRA KID By Vern Bettenay
KARRAGULLEN SCHOOL DAYS By David Laverack    

 

 

KARRAGULLEN SCHOOL HISTORY   UPDATED AUGUST 2017

Research by Gordon Freegard

The very first school in the district was started at Canning Sawmills in 1891, setup and provided by the Canning Jarrah Timber Company for the children of its workers. Later it used the Methodist Church building on the south east corner of Canning Road and Canning Mills Road, that was rented out to the Education Department. After the mill closed the school continued until diminishing numbers finally caused it close in 1930.

When the mill closed many of the workers started orchards on the land that had been cleared of the heavy timber by the mill. As the orchards got established a more central position was needed for a school so a site was established near the front gate of Illawarra Orchard in 1913. The minimum number of pupils required before a school could be established was 12. Mr. Price deliberately advertised and employed a family at Illawarra Orchard that had a large family of children to help boost the numbers for the school. That Family was the Tompsetts. The first teacher was a Mr. Fisher, an experienced teacher who batched with Keith White at Illawarra for 6 months. Then Miss Maggie Ferguson was the next teacher at this Karragullen School with minimum number of 12 children attending.

Because development went more towards to south-east, it was decided that in 1919 to move the Karragullen School to what is now Brookton Highway near the "Rock Inne". The loft at Hanbury's two storey barn was initially used while the school building was moved. As numbers increased a second schoolroom was added in 1952.

In the next few years a need for another school at Canning Mills was recommended as the numbers of children of families near the old Saw Mill site, had increased enough to justify it. In early 1936 the Under-Secretary for Lands received a request from the Director of Education, Mr. J. A. Klein, for an area of land at Canning Mills be set aside for the purpose of a school site, The Lands Department agreed to grant a site at Canning Mills in Perth water supply reserve No. 1774. The new schoolroom was erect across the road from the Methodist Church school, which had now been demolished, on the south west corner of the junction of Canning Road and Canning Mills Road. Mr. Bert Forrest was appointed the first teacher for the new Canning Mills School. The school building was late in completion so a large room at Mrs. McKay's house, which was the old mill managers house, was used temporary. This Canning Mills School continued until 1956 when it finally closed. In the meanwhile it was decided to transfer the Karragullen School into a more central position by moving it right into the townsite itself. Where it remained until it finally closed in 1999 due to falling numbers and most of the children transferred to Pickering Brook Primary School.

 

 

1913            Teacher:  Mr. Fisher
                     School Mistress:  Miss Maggie Ferguson

Schoolroom built just outside the entrance gate to "Illawarra Orchard". Officially opened 29th July 1913. Twelve children attending.

Children known to have attended:   Flossie Felts, Percy Felts, Harriet Hunter, Harry Hunter, Allice Price, Hector Price, Wilfred Price, May Tompsett, Kate Tompsett, Charlie Tompsett, Harrold Tompsett, Bill Tompsett, Dick Tompsett

 

KARRAGULLEN'S FIRST SCHOOL AT ILLAWARRA ORCHARD
 DATE OF PHOTO UNKNOWN   #1

 

 

 

1914            School Mistress:   Miss Maggie Ferguson

Miss Ferguson regularly joined the boys and girls to play cricket on an old railway formation.

Children known to have attended:   Flossie Felts, Percy Felts, Harriet Hunter, Harry Hunter, Allice Price, Hector Price, Wilfred Price, May Tompsett, Kate Tompsett, Charlie Tompsett, Harrold Tompsett, Bill Tompsett, Dick Tompsett

 

1914   

Teacher:   Miss MAGGIE FERGUSON
 Back Row (L-R): HARRY HUNTER, PERCY FELTS, HECTOR PRICE, HARRIET  HUNTER, TOMPSETT BABY, KATE TOMPSETT, MAY TOMPSETT
 Middle Row (L-R): CHARLIE TOMPSETT, FLOSSIE FELTS,            ?        ,            ?         , DICK TOMPSETT
 Front Row (L-R):     ?      HANBURY, WILFRED PRICE , ALLICE PRICE?? , PERCY TOMPSETT, BILL TOMPSETT  #2

 

1915

Children known to have attended:   May Tompsett, Kate Tompsett, Charlie Tompsett, Harrold Tompsett, Bill Tompsett, Dick Tompsett

 

1916

Children known to have attended:   May Tompsett, Kate Tompsett, Charlie Tompsett, Harrold Tompsett, Bill Tompsett, Dick Tompsett

 

1917

Children known to have attended:   Kate Tompsett, Charlie Tompsett, Harrold Tompsett, Bill Tompsett, Dick Tompsett, Frank Tompsett

 

1918

Children known to have attended:   Charlie Tompsett, Harrold Tompsett, Bill Tompsett, Dick Tompsett, Frank Tompsett, Jack Tompsett

 

1919            Teacher Mrs. Agnes E. Pine

 

 

1920             Teacher Mrs. Agnes E. Pine

Illawarra School closed 27th August 1920
School temporally held in Hanbury’s Barn Loft whilst schoolroom building was shifted from Illawarra 
Transferred Schoolroom occupied at new location near Rock Inne.
Officially opened 6th September 1920

 

                                                  

                

RECENT PICTURE HANBURY'S BARN  #4

 

RECENT PICTURE HANBURY'S BARN  #5

 

RECENT PICTURE HANBURY'S BARN  #3

 

1920 - 1924?    #33

 

1921             Teacher       Mrs. Agnes E. Pine    
 
                     Assistant      Miss Doris Bettenay

The one-room school this year, was now in its new location, having been moved from its original position near the Illawarra gate. There was a house added to the side of the schoolroom now and a new teacher, a Mrs Pine, lived in it. Mrs Pine was about 60 years of age at this time, and was to be there for another five years until her retirement. In its new location the school now served a wider district and numbers were up to about 40 children. This evidently qualified the school for an assistant, and Miss Doris Bettenay was appointed to this position and taught infants. She was not a trained teacher from the Training College, but was classed as a teaching aide. She did a good job, and was a big help to the head teacher.

Miss Bettenay rode a horse to school each morning because she came from her family orchard about three miles away. Her father and mother had started "Irymple", in 1904, and planted some acres of fruit trees. Mr Bettenay Snr. and her two brothers built a stable and a small yard in which Miss Bettenay kept her horse during the day at school.

The school ground was newly cleared, and several stumps remained to be grubbed or burned. However Mrs Pine got the bigger children to lay out gardens along the back fence, and start to beautify the grounds. They had to gather rocks from the bush, and make borders for these garden plots with paths between each plot. They also had to dig holes for trees to be planted on Arbor Day in May. Those trees are still there today (2010).

Miss Bettenay taught the children how to do Pot-hooks, strokes, circles and all manner of attempts at simple letters and figures. They started by using slates and pencils, but soon graduated to paper. She even taught them money with cardboard coins, how to add and how to count. Even how to sit properly, how to ask for something, and how to play with other children. Most of this is taught in Kindergartens today, but not so then. Seeing somebody get the cane was always a great reminder to show what could happen if you did the wrong thing by the teacher.

The main road went very close by the school fence, and was only a track. It became what is today the Brookton Highway. Occasionally a motor vehicle would come along but most of the traffic was horse drawn, mainly sleeper carters, or woodcarters with drays heading for Karragullen station or returning empty to the bush. In those days there would be men who went out for months at a time to catch possums for their skins, and others who camped out cutting sleepers or firewood. They would come in past the school and fill their waterbags or yarn to the children because they had seen so few other people for weeks or months. The track did go through to Brookton and Beverley, but only a track, and very little used. It was known as the "back-track" and for many miles it followed one of the old log-lines laid down by the Canning Jarrah Timber Company. This section crossed Kangaroo Gully, Death Adder Creek and Poison Gully, all of which today flow into the Canning Dam. Several miles of the modern bitumised Brookton Highway still runs on this old railway formation.    (Article by James "Pal" Smailes)

                

 

1922       Teacher      Mrs. Agnes E. Pine    
 
               Assistant    Miss Doris Bettenay
                Assistant    Miss Pine

On September 23rd a concert party was brought to Karragullen by Mrs. Gillies, at the request of Mrs. Pine, the local school teacher. The party comprised  Mrs. Thomson, Mrs. Goe. Horton (Miss Elsie Rosslyn), Madame Marrie, Miss Orchard, Miss Ida Geddes and Messrs Cobb and Geo. Horton. These entertainers gave much pleasure to the audience, and each item was loudly applauded. Messrs. H. P. Colebatch, Minister for Education, and R. S. Sampson, Colonnial Secretary, were present. A vote of thanks to Miss Gilles and party, to Mr. Dwyer who kindly lent a motor car to convey the singers, and the Minister for Education and the Colonial Secretary for their attendance and generosity, was moved by Mr. Harber, of the Parents' Association,and was carried with acclamation. After supper a dance took place. The proceeds of the entertainment will be used for the purchase of tennis materials for the school court.    Extract from The West Australian  Saturday 30th  September 1922

On December 9th the annual concert and prize giving of the Karragullen School was held in the local hall and was the largest gathering ever held in Karragullen. The whole programme of music and rhythmic's was given by the school children, whose teacher, Mrs. A. E. Pine , with her assistants, Miss Bettenay and Miss Pine, is to be congratulated on the clever manner in which the children's talents have been brought out. In the unavoidable absence of Mr. R. S. Sampson, M.L.A. the chair was taken by Mr. H. Stinton (Chairman of the Parents' Association). After the concert each child received a book as a Christmas gift, and the special prizes were presented by Mrs. Laverack. Penny Winter again winning Mr. Sampson's prize as dux of the school. Mr. Harber then distributed the gardening prizes, and the senior girls presented Mrs. Pine, Miss Bettenay and Miss Pine each with a suit case from the children and parents, in appreciation of their services through the year. After a few dances, and the singing of the "National Anthem", the gathering broke up.      Extract from The West Australian Wednesday 3rd January 1923

The start of 1922 was of course much better than the start of the previous year. I was now six, and put into what was known as Infants 11. Quite superior to those poor soles just starting out at the bottom of the educational ladder. I will never forget 1922 because it was the first time that I became aware of a date, or year. Up in the top left hand corner of the blackboard, Miss Bettenay had the date of the day, and each school day she would rub out the previous day's date and put a new one, then every so often the middle figure would change, being the month, but this 1922 seemed to remain for ever. One day I picked up the courage to ask her why it was never changed. She thought that was marvelous, that at my age I had noticed such a thing, and went to no end to explain the years, and how it would change in due course. Over the following years, a craving for dates and figures became very apparent in my life and search for knowledge. I attach great importance to dates because it places all event in proper sequence, and gives a far clearer picture of history and ages. Had Miss Bettenay laughed at me or not gone to such trouble to explain it, my whole attitude to dates and figures could have been different. It is debatable of course.       (Article by James "Pal" Smailes)

            

1923        Teacher     Mrs. Agnes E. Pine    
 
                Assistant   Miss Doris Bettenay

The monthly meeting of the Karragullen Parent's Association was held on the 9th April, when an election of a school board took place, the following members were chosen: - Messrs. Laverick, Simpson, Smailes, Prosser and Harber. The proceeds of the association's last entertainment (over 5 pounds (10 dollars) are to go to the Children's Hospital.     Extract from The West Australian Monday 23rd April 1923

The celebration of Anzac Day took place in the Karragullen Hall, on April 25th, when a large gathering assembled from the surrounding district. The proceedings opened with the singing of "Rule Britannia", the solo part being taken by Mrs. G. Simpson. The chairman, Mr. J.A.S. Hanbury introduced the Rev. T. Allan, who addressed the people. The school children then sang an Anzac song, under the direction of their teacher, Mrs. Pine, who also played the accompaniments. Mr. Sampson, Colonial Secretary and member for the district, spoke on the motives which prompted the soldiers to give up everything in order to go and fight for those they loved, and of the women who stayed behind "doing their bit". He hoped that, while we remembered the dead, we would not forget those who came back, but would give them all the help and encouragement we could. He then unveiled a tablet erected by the Karragullen people to the memory of Private Samuel Verrier, also an honour board, given for the local school children by the Parents' Association. Kipling's "Lest We Forget" was sung, and offerings of flowers placed beneath the tablet. The chairman expressing the wish of the people that Lieut. Lantzke's name be associated with that of Samuel Verrier, both of whom had not lived nor died in vein. A German gun was the unveiled by the Rev. T. Allan, and the National Anthem closed the proceeding.    Extract from The West Australian Friday 4th May 1923

I well remember the year 1923 because of several very important happenings in my young life. To move out of Infants 11 and enter Class 1 was evidently  of some significance to a seven year old, and to have a younger brother in your charge also had a certain responsibility. Ken, being six in the coming June, was able to start at school in February of that year. We were always good friends at home, so I took it upon myself to take him to school and show him the ropes so to speak. Miss Bettenay continued to ride her horse to the school each day, and keep it in the small yard and stable which her father and brother had built near by. In the shelter shed was an old piano case in which was kept the horses chaff. Miss Bettenay selected me to feed her horse each lunch time from this feed store, and of course I thought this to be a great honour. It meant taking a kero tin of chaff to the trough in the stable and then drawing a tin of water from the tank at Mrs. Pine's house and topping up the water barrel for the horse. I evidently carried out my duties well, because at the end of the year she gave me a new box of coloured pencils, the first I had ever owned. There were other events however not so pleasant.        (Article by James "Pal" Smailes)

           

1924       Teacher      Mrs. Agnes E. Pine    
 
               Assistant    Miss Doris Bettenay

When School started in 1924 there were quite a few changes. The biggest being that there were fewer children at school and only one teacher. Miss Bettenay had been retrenched because the numbers had dropped below what was considered necessary to need an assistant. There would be about 30 children at school now, instead of 40. For me it was the first year under the Headmistress anyway. I had graduated to 2nd standard and was in what was called the "uppers". Of course all being in one room, we could not but help hear what was going on in each and every class. Even when you were learning three times tables you could hear the older children learning eight times tables, so you became well prepared for future lessons. Mrs. Pine now taught everybody, and looking back one must admit, she had her hands full. Children ranged from 5 to 14 spread through nine grades or classes. Infants 1 and 11, then class 1 to 7, sometimes only two or three children in a particular class. The desks held five children, and were in two rows of five facing the teachers desk, which was raised up on a low stage or platform across the width of the room. There was a fireplace in the left-hand corner, and a big timber cupboard in the other corner. It was in this that all spare books, pads, ink etc. was kept. When the days got cooler each year a boy from about eight upwards would be put on "duties" which included chopping the wood each day for the fire, and leaving some twigs and chips for starting the fire next morning. This position was for a week, then another boy took over according to age and class. Other duties included filling the ink wells, and reading the weather. We had to put down the noon temperature, direction of wind, and measure any rainfall that had occurred. It was all good training.      

Mrs. Pine was very patriotic also. There was a flag pole in the school yard, and the Australian Flag was run up each morning and lowered when school finished for the day. When the bell rung at five minutes to nine, we all had to form up in two lines according to age, and on command turn and salute the flag. We then marched in lead by the eldest children, and took our places at our desks. When Mrs. Pine came in last, she took her place beside her desk, and we repeated "The Lords Prayer" after her. At nine o'clock school commenced. Three half hour periods, then half an hour for a morning break, then two more periods to mid-day. An hour for lunch, two more sessions to 2p.m. then a quarter hour break, two more lessons, then out at 3.15. Us three Smailes kids had two and a half miles to walk, and used to go via Simpsons place and join up with their two boys, George and Lloyd, then continue on to school, then reverse the procedure after school. During 1924 however Ken and I explored the possibility of cutting through the bush, and shortening the journey slightly. This we did, and as time went on we wore a well defined path through the bush, and took off unnecessary corners.    

1924 was an election year in the United States, and Mrs. Pine was a great admirer of America, and got the children to list all the Presidents back from then to the beginning of their system and George Washington. Calvin Coolidge was President at the time, and was re-elected later in the year. He was No.30, and we had to look up all the previous 29 and list them in their proper order. President Harding had died in 1923 during his term, and Coolidge as Vice-President had completed that term and was to stand again. President Wilson was the one before Haring, and his name was on all lips because of his fame at the Peace Conference and aftermath of the Great War. However, we children completed the list, and we had to learn them. I can remember them to this day, and have automatically added a further ten Presidents as history has unfolded. It just shows how ones mind can be influenced at an early age, especially by a dedicated teacher. Mrs. Pine was also keen on poetry, music and singing, even used to take girls for piano lessons after school. We boys were never given the opportunity.       (Article by James "Pal" Smailes)

             

1925          Teacher Mrs. Agnes E. Pine  Retired at the end of the year

At school there was not much change during 1925, we all went up one class, whether by merit or not we will never know. Old Mrs. Pine had her favourites, and the Smailes children were not amongst them. She used the cane fairly liberally, even on the girls, but I have no doubt that she was fully justified. From about this time onwards, it was Mrs. Pine who awakened in me a love for poetry. Each class had to learn a new poem at least once a month, and keep revising poems already learnt. She insisted on observing the punctuation, demanded clarity, and would always give us some background on the writer, be it Kendell, Keats, Lawson, Paterson or Dorothy McKelar. She was a very well read person and wanted to get us interested in literature. Every Friday afternoon for the last half hour of the day, she would read from a book to all classes combined. To this day I can remember her reading "Inanhoe", "The Talisman", "The White Company" and "Kenilworth". She certainly created a love of reading in myself, and no doubt in many others. Of course few people owned many books as compared with today. I clearly remember one boy especially telling the whole school one day, that their Dad had been able to buy a book to have in their home, and it even had pictures in it.

The school had no books as a library, the teacher either owned or borrowed a volume which was read to the class. Children who had books were encouraged to bring one or two to school for the teacher to read. Dad was a great reader, and had quite a few. About this time he started to buy each of us what were known as the "Wonder Books". The wonder book of ships, trains, animals etc. They were ideal for growing children, and we used to lend them to the teacher for reading to the school. 1925 was the 100th anniversary of the locomotive, and created quite a lot of interest. Steam power was at its zenith, particularly the railway engines in various parts of the world. I just loved reading about the huge engines employed on the Canadian Pacific Railway and in the U.S.A. Then there were the luxurious fast trains used in England, and speed records set by different countries, and tonnages hauled. Even our own local railway was unique with the Zig-zag method of climbing the Darling Range, and the big double engines which were used. They were Garret engines made especially for sharp curves and steep climbs. It was all part of growing up to watch these monsters and help the guard throw the points during shunting procedures, Karragullen being the terminus of the Upper Darling Range Railway.           (Article by James "Pal" Smailes)

          

1926      Teacher Cecil Johnston
               Assistant  Maysie Johnston

Looking back over a long period of years certain dates stand out more than others. I think that it is more your stage in life, and your ability to understand certain happenings, than the actual events themselves. There were so many events took place during 1926 that I remember it as one of the most dramatic years of my childhood. I had had my tenth birthday in November of 1025, and the old lady school teacher retired at the close of the school year. We were all very concerned about who we would get as our new teacher, but one thing certain was that it was to be a man. None of us had ever experienced a man teacher, and of course the usual rumours and stories were bandied about as to what to expect, particularly the boys.

Well our new teacher was a Mr. Johnston, and he turned out to be very good, just what was needed for the 30 odd children, some of which were getting a bit big and cheeky for the previous lady to handle. Mr. Johnston was married and lived in the school house with his wife and daughter. Mrs. Johnston taught the girls sewing, and Mr. Johnston commenced teaching the boys tin-work which was not possible up to now. He used the cane freely, but certainly not without cause. I found him to be strict but generally a better teacher. We could not bluff him, and he pushed us further if we showed any ability. He was very keen on sports and daily exercises, and taught us many new games and manly activities. He used to fill the blackboards up with the work for the next day overnight, and conducted six and seven classes in the one room.

He would always read some article of interest out of the daily paper. It was not that days paper, usually next day, but something that was topical or happening at the time. I particularly remember following the progress of Alan Cobham's flight in 1926 from England to Australia and return. It was the first return flight, and took some 30 days each way. His mechanic, named Elliot, was shot by an Arab while flying low in a dust storm in the Euphrates valley between Baghdad and Basra. He died of his wounds, and a Sgt. Ward of the Royal Air Force joined Cobham to complete the trip. The triumphs and failures of the Australian Eleven in England that year was also a great subject with Mr. Johnston, and we were introduced to names like Grimmet, Oldfield, Collins, McCartney and many others, and of course the love of cricket was born in many of the boys of that era. He also stimulated the love of books, and encouraged any of us to read books of our choice or ones that he would lend us. He would question us on a book which we were supposed to have read, and could always if you had really read it or were just saying you had. He himself could read a book in a night, and tell the whole story next day, where we would take weeks and then not know half of it. He was also a wizard with figures and could add up several columns of figures at a great speed with accuracy which amazed us poor children. He was the first person to encourage me with figures, and told me that I had a flair for arithmetic and figures.

Another first for us children in 1926 was a visit to the Royal Show at Claremont. We all went down on an old truck and took a picnic lunch. To see such activity and crowds was just unbelievable to us. I had never seen a tractor, as the orchardists used horses for ploughing, and to see dozens of them in various sizes, colours and makes just was a dream come true. Also harvesters, ploughs, windmills and trucks which we did not even know existed, lined up in dozens. Then of course the hot-dog stalls, cool drinks and ice-creams which country children never saw, just there for a few pence. We took part in coconut shy's and all sorts of side-shows, and generally got fleeced and taken down. But it was a great day, and a wonderful experience for us growing children.

Going to the show however did cost me a days attendance from the school, and when prizes were given out at the end of the year, I did get the only prize for attendance. One day missed for the whole year. And it turned out to be the only prize I ever received throughout my 9 years at school. The effort of attendance was all the more creditable when one considers that 1926 was one of the wettest years on record, and we had to walk a five mile return trip every day through the bush. I well remember going one wet day on my own from home and only 5 children were at school because of the intense rain. That year there was great floods around Guildford, and the Swan River actually lapped over the old causeway at times. There was also serious flooding at Kelmscott and Cannington because Canning Dam had then not been built to control it.          (Article by James "Pal" Smailes)

                  

1926

Back Row (L -R):         BILL HANBURY, LIONEL STINTON, ERNEST HANBURY, JOHN COOPER, TED SAUNDERS, DAVID LAVERICK, NORMAN LANTZKE, GEORGE SIMPSON,
                                        ALF DAVIES, PAL SMAILES, BERNARD COOPER, BOB ABBOTT, KEN SMAILES.
 Middle Row (L - R):      EILEEN HUDSON, PEG SAUNDERS, DOLLY SOUTHERN, CLARE LAVERACK, FREDA LANTZKE, VENIE SMAILES, DOT  HANBURY,
                                        ANGUS SAUNDERS (partly hidden), ROMA STINTON, OLIVER HANBURY.
 Front Row (L- R):        LESLIE DANIELS, REG LANTZKE, LLOYD SIMPSON, BLANCHE O'MEAGHER, TOM O'MEAGHER, KATHLEEN HANBURY, JACK O'MEAGHER,
                                        EILEEN DANIELS, RICHARD RENTON, MONTIE SMAILES.  #6

 

1927              Teacher Cecil Johnston
                       Assistant Maysie Johnston

At school I was in Class 5 and under Mr. Johnston was doing quite well. He was very strict, and kept us boys really in line. He used to give all children some drill every morning for exercise, and take part in games such as cricket and football. He greatly encouraged us with reading whole books, not only reading to us, but used to get each of us in turn to read a chapter or a few paragraphs to the class. He loved to read poetry to us also, particularly Banjo Patterson and Henry Lawson. Having come from Maitland in New South Wales, he had grown up at a time when these men were at their peak in their writing. Books were still rare in many homes, but he liked us to bring some to school to share with others, and encouraged us to write short stories to read out aloud to the class. Each Friday for the last period he would read a story to the whole school, which as we grew older we began to understand better, and grasp the real meaning of what he was trying to get across to us. I am sure that it was Mr. Johnston who developed in me, the love of reading both books and poetry, not just as a lesson, but for the sheer pleasure of learning and the love of language and knowledge.

This teacher continued to read to us many articles from the daily paper, and to try and create an interest in events around the world, and particularly in our own country. Anything to do with the then infant aviation development would always be a must with him, and during 1927 there were some events which did have a profound effect upon the future of aviation worldwide and especially on Australia. A Captain E. Jones had created a record to fly around Australia, visiting all capital cities in 22 days and 11hours. The world was amazed, as aircraft were as yet very experimental. However to two unknown pilots in W.A. it became a challenge. Kingsford Smith had just sold out his Gascoyne Transport Co. in Carnarvon, and bought a small Bristol aircraft. His friend Charles Ulm, also an experienced pilot, had financial backing so they attempted to lower Jones' record to gain support for their long range plans to fly the Pacific Ocean. In June 1927, Smithy and Ulm completed the 7,500 miles flight around Australia in 10 days and 5 hours. This did cause a sensation, and the eyes of the world were focused on Australia, aviation and these two men. In the same year, in a different field, another Australian named Hubert Wilkins had flown over the North Pole for the first time in a tri-motored Fokker aircraft. This too created great interest, and laid the course for greater events to come. Not all ventures were so successful. In August 1927 there was a race organised in California to fly from San Francisco to Hawaii, which had never been done before. Entries came from many people seeking publicity and reward, but the results were disastrous, seven people loosing their lives, and nobody achieving the object of 2,400 miles across the open sea.

Several other flights were planned that year to fly the Atlantic Ocean both from Europe to U.S.A. and also in an Eastern direction. Here again many men and their machines were lost in futile attempts. The French war ace, Nunguesser was one of the victims, and some Governments forbade further attempts at such foolhardy ventures. One day in May however, a young American named Lindberg took off from America and flew non-stop across the Atlantic to land in France, in a single engined monoplane. He was named the " flying fool" but he did demonstrate that these flights could be done if properly planned, and the right aircraft used. He was the hero of the hour.

These happenings, and many more in other fields of human endeavour, were always brought to our attention by Mr. Johnston, and he would refer to a world map or atlas as the case may be, and show us where these events were taking place, especially if Austraila or Australians were involved. A very important event of 1927 was the visit of the Duke and Duchess of York for the opening of the new Parliment House in the new capital city of Canberra. No body seemed to have heard of the place, and few lived there, because the Federal Government was based in Melbourne since Federation. When the opening was completed, the seat of Government became Canberra, and the city made a start to develop as was intended. Even today it is growing apace, and sixty years from that opening, will be the opening of the new and larger Parliment House in 1988.

The Royal Tour was followed with interest by the schools generally, and when the Royal couple came to Fremantle aboard the cruiser H.M.S.Renown, Mr. Johnston allowed any of us able to take the day off and watch a parade or visit to the ship. Dad took us children to the quay to inspect the huge ship, and as luck had it, the Royal couple drove past us as we waited to go aboard. The Renown was really something for a schoolboy to see. Its huge 15 inch guns, capable of hurling a one ton shell about 25 miles, its engine rooms packed with great engines all hot and hissing, the flags, the discipline of the men and the paint, made us all want to join the Navy.        (Article by James "Pal" Smailes)

                  

 

1928               Teacher Cecil Johnston  Went on Long Service Leave.
                        Assistant Maysie Johnston  Went on Long Service Leave
 
                       Relieving Teacher Mr. Brookhouse who rode a bike from Maida Vale each day. He retired before the year was up.
                        Teacher Miss Wells took over

One of the first books that Mr. Johnston obtained in 1928 was written by Sir Phillip Gibbs, and entitled "The Day After Tomorrow". It was a bit ahead of most of the children at school that year, but it was basically his views on what was to come in the almost immediate future. One remark which I well remember was that he wished that he could have been a schoolboy in 1928. Well I was, and as far as I could tell it was wonderful anyway. So much happening, many new developments, and I was growing up right when it was all going to happen. There were pessimists of course, some were right but most were wrong. Nobody then foresaw the Depression of next year, or the dark clouds of war which were once again to darken the lights of Europe, and threaten even the shores of our own Australia. Many of these same students were destined to play their part in it, even to the extent of giving up their lives in its defence of our North.

Upon returning to school in early February, Mr. Johnston told us that in June, or in Mid-year, he was going to take his long service leave, and would be away for the second half of the year. He was going to the Eastern States and New Zealand, and wanted us to obtain all the information we could, on places of interest which he intended to visit. He would tell us all about these places when he returned. Thus we searched for places on maps and articles on towns, cities, river and mountains both in Australia and in New Zealand. Even if he did not benefit from our research, we certainly did, and found out more about the world than we had ever suspected. He really knew how to appeal to young minds, and could make it all sound so interesting and wonderful and so worthwhile. He did have trouble with some children, and was a bit short on patience in some cases. He detested laziness in a student, would not tolerate lying, and would use the cane fairly and with effect if the case warranted such measures. I received my share but totally agree that he was right. The months that followed proved this point.

Of course we little knew that we were watching history being made, and were even part of it. Just as it is going on today, one is not always aware of how important an event can be, but with the advantage of hindsight, certain events stand out like beacons. Such were the events of 1928, particularly in aviation and land speed records. Mr. Johnston readily took any opportunity to follow and explain any speed record attempt, or a dash to lower the times of a flight or long distance endeavour. Such was the case when on February 7th 1928 a young Australian named Bert Hinkler took off from London on the first solo flight for Australia. Each day his progress was recorded in the papers, and read with great enthusiasm by young and old. Some people had crude radios by now, and stole a march with a more recent bulletin. Often the static or a flat battery prevented hearing the latest. However all went well, he had delays, bad weather, hold-ups with officialdom, and fuel supply problems but on 22nd February after 15 1/2 days he landed in Darwin, setting an all time record for a flight so long and arduous. He was the hero of the hour, and was feted in all capital cities, particularly in his home town of Bundaberg in Queensland.

Later in the year Mr. Johnston was on holidays in New Zealand and his successor, a Mr. Brookhouse, was not as enthusiastic about such news. This poor old man lived in Maida Vale at the foot of Kalamunda hill and used to ride a push-bike the 15 miles every morning to the Karragullen school. He had taken on the relieving teachers role for the six months from July to December while Mr. Johnston was on long service leave. Us kids quickly nicknamed Mr. Brookhouse, "Chook" short for chookhouse. On wet days he was usually late, and gradually we children got "his measure" as children will do if there is half an opportunity. We learnt how to get into the school via a window, and if he was late, we would wait for him a while, then go walkabout, returning about 10a.m. or wait till we saw him coming up the road, and ring the bell to spur him on. We made his life a hell, and he did not seem to be able to do anything about it. He eventually bought a Model T Ford car, and improved his traveling time, but used to have trouble starting this car, and was late at times. He used to get us children to push it sometimes to start it, until one day when we were exhausted, one of the boys who could drive, noticed that the key was not turned on. That finished the job of pushing. One day he went for a walk along the main road, so we all piled into his car, and Bernard Cooper who was 13 and could drive well, took off after him. We passed him and turned around and offered him a ride back to school. It was a disastrous situation, and I cannot understand how it went on for so long. He even got Mr. Simpson, a near neighbour, to come to school and talk to us. The two Simpson boys were among the chief offenders, so that had little effect. In cranking his car one day, it backfired and broke his wrist. This of course made it impossible for him to control us with a cane, so he must have notified the Education Department and resigned at the end of September. A bucket of water strategically place above the door, to douse him when he opened the door, was the last straw, and this ended our escapades. We were not bad kids, it was just lack of discipline, and we took the opportunity to vent our fun at the old mans expense. An 18 year old Miss Wells, straight from training college took over on 1st October, and with a visible bundle of canes in her hand as she walked into the class, and asked certain boys to come out and explain themselves. On refusing to move, she just took a cane and broke it over this boy until he cringed in terror. There was no more trouble and no more caning. She was boss, and rightly so. What a difference this girl made, She really put us through our paces in sport, reading and all subjects, and regained our faith in teachers and the education system generally. It was a classical example of what children will do when they loose respect for a teacher and will go as far as they are able, but it was no credit to the Department that this state of affairs was ever allowed to deteriorate as it did. No inspector ever came to check up or support that poor old teacher, or even see how the young teacher coped in her first assignment with such an unruly school. There are men who live in Karragullen today who remember these events, and recall the pain of the cane.

         (From an article by James "Pal" Smailes)                

 

Below is an extract from an Oral History that Ken Smailes did for the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library.

When Cecil Johnson went, he went to New Zealand, I'm not sure if it was for three months or if it was for six months, anyway while he was away they sent a fellow called Brookhouse up there. And he used to ride a push bike from Maida Vale which is a long way, it is all up hill but, then later on he had a "T" (model) Ford motor car and the only way to start it was to crank it, the crank handle, was permanently in it and it was foolish to press down on the handle because they used to kick, it would kick back and it did and broke his wrist, hit him on the back of the hand , the handle flew around belted him on the back of the hand and broke it. Anyway, of course the kids could see that they - we could take advantage of him and we did. We would give him until nine o'clock and if he wasn't there then we would leave and we'd go up on this big rock outcrop. I never realised in those days that I would own it one day. But the whole school would go up there and just play and just do nothing and I remember one day - all our dinner - all our school bags were still at the school. I went back with Willy Hanbury, went back to get the dinner, get our school bags and this fellow, we used to call him "chook", instead of Brookhouse, it was "chookhouse", and he was always known as "chook", anyway he was there, he was looking for us, anyway we waited until he had gone, he used to walk up to Brookton Highway, you know he used to go up there everyday for a walk, anyway this day he was up there looking for us and Willy went in and rang the bell, he rang the bell for the teacher. Anyway, then we went, we took the lunches and went and we never came at all that day.

He was very, very upset about it. Anyway things got from bad to worse. Another day, we used to do everything, everything we could think of to upset him. How it ended up, we really took advantage of everything. One day when he had gone up the road for a walk we had this big skeleton of a horse, we brought it along and put it near the door so the skull would fall down when he opened the door. Now we broke his cane up into match wood and stuck it on his table and there was all these old vegetables in the school garden or in the schoolhouse garden and we put them all on the table. These great big beetroots and turnips that had all gone to seed. We put them all on the table and we put glue on the door knob and put drums on the roof, (we) really played havoc anyway when he came home - came to school, he didn't know what to say. He called on the two biggest to go and get Mr. Simpson and Mr. Hodson and they went got them to come along and anyway that was the end of it, our father wouldn't let us go back. He said that you are not going back 'til you get a proper teacher there because we would have done serious damage so we had better things to do at home. We got the message that there was somebody coming on a certain date to take over, anyway when we got back, we'd heard in advance that there was a young girl, she was straight out of college and she was going to board at Simpson's and the day she arrived all the kids were sitting on the fence there, all laughing and playing around and as she walked down the road she had a bundle of canes, four foot canes under her arm and as she walked in the gate she said, "Are you fit?" and we laughed and it was funny, we thought well, we are all right and we'll fix her. Anyway, we - as soon as we went in the school and she was getting things , she lined us up outside, before we would just do as we liked, but this day we had to march in and sit down and anyway the first one to speak out of turn was Tommy O'Meagher and she called him out to - she was going to give him the cane anyway he was - as he walked out he looking back grinning all over his face. Anyway she told him to hold out his hand and, he just laughed at her and she just belted him. She got this cane and she thrashed him, 'round his behind and around his legs and everywhere and half the cane flew across the room and within minutes he was screaming and he went back to his seat and he never - there was no more trouble from him. Anyway a few minutes later she had me out there, I don't know what for, I can't remember what I did anyway my fingers were blue, you know she had me - I had all I wanted and after that she turned out to be not only a good teacher but also a good friend, she did a good job but she was only there a short while and the real teacher came back after that. Johnson came back. It was really terrible the advantage we took of poor old "chook". We used to just do what we liked.

 

 

1929            Teacher Cecil Johnston
                     Assistant Maysie Johnston

Mr. Johnston returned to the school teaching for the opening of the 1929 school year, and was full of his trip and experiences since leaving us in the previous June. He told us about the geysers and hot springs of New Zealand, the snow capped ranges and the lakes and fiords throughout the country. He had also visited Melbourne and Sydney and Adelaide. He described the cable trams of Melbourne, the beginnings of the Sydney Harbour Bridge, and the wonders of the Nullabour Plain and Transcontinental trains. He had taken many pictures of his travels, and had many books and pamphlets to give us a better idea of what he had seen. Most children were very interested, and his way of showing us all this was better than geography or history lessons. He also took up his reference to the daily papers, and drew our attention to any event of interest or importance which was happening. Aviation was always a must with him, and when Smithy and his crew on the Southern Cross were reported missing in our far North at the end of March, he kept us fully informed. Simpsons had a wireless set, and one of the boys would go home during the lunch hour to get the latest news, or lack of it.

The days dragged on into a week and no news of where they had come down. Not a sign or trace of men or plane. Every available aircraft was engaged to search likely areas, and Kieth Anderson, a great friend of Smithy's set out with a mechanic named Hitchcock to join in the search. They in turn became missing near Wave Hill Station, and died of thirst twelve days later. It seemed impossible for a plane of this size to completely disappear without trace. At long last on the 13th April the Southern Cross was located 300 miles from Whyndam on a mud flat almost hidden by scrub. The crew had lived on grubs, fish and wild berries, and had made every effort to get in touch by radio, but to no avail because of flat batteries and lack of general equipment. A small plane flew in some fuel and Smithy flew the Southern Cross out on his own to save weight. They then returned to Sydney without honour amid much criticism and bad feeling because of the deaths of Anderson and Hitchcock. After a public enquiry, the crew were absolved of all blame and allowed to proceed on their attempt to fly to London in record time. This was accomplished in 12 days and 18 hours which put Smithy back in public favour again.

Another first for our school occurred in 1929 concerning foreign born children. An Italian wood cutter named Rocco Macri, went back to Italy late in 1928 and returned with his wife and two children to live near the school on Hanbury's orchard. These two children, Dominica and Joe, aged 10 and 7, could not speak a word of English, and I am afraid we children gave them a rough time and showed little sympathy. Mr. Johnston just did not have the time to give them any special attention either, and could not help with the language problem. They would go home at lunch time and return at 1.00p.m. with their lunch and eat it in class, much to our amusement. As they learned a few words of English, (not always the right words) they were absorbed into our games and lessons. The next few years, particularly during the depression, brought many children to the school, but these two were the first and must have had an awful time with our ridicule.

The schools in the hills districts were to combine in an inter-school sports contest to compete for a shield donated by Mr. R. S. Sampson, our Member for the Swan seat in the State Legislative Assembly. This gathering was held at the Carilla Hall and sports ground near Pickering Brook early in October of 1929. The schools competing were Barton's Mill, Pickering Brook, Canning Mills, Karragullen and Carmel. Mr. Johnston had got us all trained in the various sports, and trained well in advance. There were some big children at school, well above average in strength and ability, so Karragullen were favourites to take out the shield. Would you believe that the whole school came down with measles over the preceding few weeks, and some of our best athletes were scarcely out of bed when the sports were held. Some could not even compete, but even so we came second, runners up to Barton's Mill with Pickering Brook third in points.

I actually left school three weeks before my 14th birthday because of the measles in a way. I was one of the last to get the measles, and was to stay home for the usual 3 weeks. When this time was up, the school had had exams, and there was no point in going back. There was no certificate to be issued, and further schooling was not on.         (Article by James "Pal" Smailes)

                                             

 

1930              Teacher Mr. Ronald Oliver
                       Assistant Yvonne Oliver

The second annual U.D.R.Inter-schools' sports competition for the Sampson Shield was held at Carmel on November 1st. The competing schools were Karragullen, Barton's Mill, Pickering Brook, Carmel, Piesse Brook and Lesmurdie. Carmel school again won the shirld with 3? 1/2 points, followed by Karragullen with 26 points and Barton's Mill with 22 points. Stanley Wallis (Carmel) was Champion Boy, and A. Weyman (Karragullen) Champion Girl. The chief events resulted as follows:- Boys' Junior Championship - V. Hawkins (Pickering Brook). Girls' Junior Championship - L. Jackson (Carmel). Boys' Championship - Stanley Wallis (Carmel). Girls' Championship - A. Weyman (Karragullen). Schools' Relay Race - Carmel 1; Barton's Mill 2; Karragullen 3: Boys' High Jump - Stanley Wallis (Carmel). Girls' High Jump - B. Leeder (Pickering Brook), tied with H. Walker (Piesse Brook). Boys' Long Jump - Stanley Wallis (Carmel). Girls' Long Jump - A. Weyman (Karragullen). Boys' Hop, Step and Jump - Stanley Wallis (Carmel): distance 31ft. 10in. Girls' Hop, Step and Jump - Mary Wallis (Carmel).

 

 

"THE OLD BUSH SCHOOL 1920 - 1930"  By JAMES "PAL" SMAILES

There's a place called Karragullen, in the Upper Darling Range,
That has felt the hand of progress, in this modern world of change,
There are mighty tarmac highways, where once the horse was king,
And the present farms and orchards have replaced the axe's ring
Where the sleeper hewer laboured, with his now forgotten trade,
And the whine of steam and saw-mill, no longer fills the glades.

The trucks and buses service, have replaced the daily train,
Which struggled up the zig-zag, a schedule to maintain,
Electric light and telephone, are now accepted ways,
Where kerosene-wick lanterns, showed the path of by-gone days.
A modern hall and school rooms, planned by those we hope are wise,
Have replaced the old School building, near "The Tavern of the Rise."

Removed in nineteen twenty, from the Illawarra gate,
'Twas built with house provided, and re-opened on that date,
The site was then most central, in a district vast and wide,
Yet forty children walked to school, no buses then to ride,
Miss Bettenay in infants taught, Headmistress Mrs Pine,
But with her cane and stern command, all forty "toed the line."

The shrill of voices filled the yard, the cricket bat and ball
The girls would play at "rounders", and "Blackie" was for all.
There was a swing and see-saw, to help with trials and joys,
At sewing class the girls were taught, and tin-work for the boys,
The children planted gardens out, and trees on Arbor Day,
To mark the year when each left school, those pines "that sigh today."

The Laveracks and Prices, the Thompsetts from the east,
The Smailes' and the Simpsons, the Winters not the least,
The Harbors and the Stintons, the Hudsons and the rest,
All came to school with Steffans, and the Abbots from the west,
Then from the south came Lillymans with Prossers further yet,
The Hanburys and the Hiscoes, and the Stanleys don't forget.

Then there were the Saunders, the Lantzkes and the Mahers,
The Fergusons and Coopers, and the Bettenays from afar,
But with the years the names have changed, though some remain today
Remembering yet those early times, but most have moved away
The building of the Canning Dam, with catchment far and wide,
Wrote death to many orchards, and spelt doom to men of pride.

Then as the years rolled slowly by, the teachers came and went,
We had our Mr Johnston next, then Brookhouse old and bent,
That poor old man had no control, the children rang the bells,
In three short months resign he must, then came a cute Miss Wells,
Within two days she gained command, by use of bluff and cane
There's many a man alive today, no doubt recalls the pain.

The twenty's closed with a few at school, new names replaced the old,
Depression times then hard and tough, brought migrants to the fold,
With newer orchards coming up, the district slowly grew
Till came the war with labour short, and comforts scarce and few
But with the peace the progress came, prosperity the prize,
The Old Bush School has seen it all, near "The Tavern on the "Rise."

 

 

1931              Teacher Mr. Ronald Oliver
                       Assistant Yvonne Oliver

Below is an extract from an Oral History that Ken Smailes did for the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library.

Richard Oliver was good. he came in - I was with him for two years 1930 and '31 and he had a wife and two girls and a boy - that's right. He took up land in Karragullen. He started an orchard and built a house and he was around Karragullen for - I don't know, I can't remember, it could have been twenty years. So, he was a nice chap and he was a good teacher too. He used to teach the piano, he taught Venie, my sister, music on the piano. So yes that was the extent of my education.

 

1931

#21

SCHOOL REPORT CLASS 7 22nd December 1931
 JACK MAHER (O'MEAGHER)  #22

 

1932              Teacher Mr. Ronald Oliver
                       Assistant Yvonne Oliver

 

1933              Teacher Mr. Ronald Oliver
                       Assistant Yvonne Oliver

 

1934              Teacher Mr. Ronald Oliver
                       Assistant yvonne Oliver
                       Assistant Julie Maslin

 

1935              Teacher Mr. Ronald Oliver
                       Assistant Yvonne Oliver

 

1935

VERY POOR QUALITY PHOTOGRAPH PUBLISHED IN THE "WESTERN MAIL" THURSDAY 12th DECEMBER 1935
 UNFORTUNATELY ALL NEGATIVES LOST HAVE BEEN LOST. IF YOU HAVE A BETTER COPY CONTACT US.

 

1936              Teacher Mr. Ronald Oliver
                       Assistant Yvonne Oliver

 

1937              Teacher Mr. Ronald Oliver
                       Assistant Yvonne Oliver

 

1937     

Back Row L- R:   RON OLIVER,          ?                ,  MARCO SCARI, ERIC BETTENAY.   
 Middle Row L - R:  TONY SCARI, Teacher's Wife YVONNE OLIVER, BILL SCARI,           ?         , DOROTHY BETTENAY,          ?             ,HILDA BUCKINGHAM,
 ELEANOR BETTENAY, LLOYD SIMPSON, KEITH BETTENAY.

 Front Row Sitting L - R:    EDNA BUCKINGHAM,                 ?                   ,  MARGARET SCARI ,              ?               .
 Sitting L - R:   RENATO (RON) CASOTTI ? , PHILIP BETTENAY.

                                                                                                                                  (Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1938              Teacher Mr. Ronald Oliver
                       Assistant Yvonne Oliver

 

1938c  

Back Row L- R:   DOROTHY BETTENAY, EDNA BETTENAY, HILDA BUCKINGHAM, ELEANOR BETTENAY
 Middle Row L - R:          ?          ,       ?         , LES  O'MEAGHER, KEITH BETTENAY, RONNIE OLIVER, ERIC BETTENAY, MARCO SCARI,        SIMPSON.
 Front Row Sitting L - R:    MARGARET McVITTIE,  MARGARET SCARI, DOREEN O'MEAGHER,     ?         , EDNA BUCKINGHAM, KATHLEEN MACRI.
 Sitting L - R:   RENATO (RON) CASSOTTI, ANGELO MACRI?, TONY SCARI, BILL SCARI, FORTUNATO MACRI, PHILIP BETTENAY.


                                                                                                                                   (Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1939           Teacher Mr. Ronald Oliver
                    Assistant/Sewing Teacher Yvonne Oliver

                    There were less than 20 pupils attending the school. Margaret Price and Malcolm O'Meagher were the only children to commence school this year. Others still attending school this year were: Hilda & Edna Buckingham, Marco, Margaret, Tony & Bill Scari, Doreen, Les & Malcolm O'Meagher, Margaret McVittie, Kathleen, Fortunato & Angelo Macri, Renato Cassotti, Joy & Fred Smith. All the Bettenay's had left except Philip

 

1940            Teacher Mr. John Halse
                     Assistant
/Sewing Teacher Jean Halse

 

1941            Teacher Mr. John Halse
                     Assistant
/Sewing Teacher Jean Halse

1941

VERY POOR QUALITY PHOTOGRAPH PUBLISHED IN THE "WESTERN MAIL" THURSDAY 20th NOVEMBER 1941
 UNFORTUNATELY ALL NEGATIVES HAVE BEEN LOST. IF YOU HAVE A BETTER COPY CONTACT US.

 

1942            Teacher Mr. John Halse
                     Assistant
/Sewing Teacher Jean Halse

Over 50 children attending

 

1943            Teacher John Halse  (On War Service)
                     Teacher Mr. Ted Robinson?
                     Assistant
/Sewing Teacher Jean Halse

Over 50 children attending

 

1944             Teacher Mr. Ted Robinson
                      Assistant
/Sewing Teacher Dora Robinson

Over 50 children attending

 

1945             Teacher Mr. Ted Robinson
                      Assistant
/Sewing Teacher Dora Robinson

Over 50 children attending

 

1946             Teacher Mr. Ted Robinson
                      Assistant
/Sewing Teacher Dora Robinson

 

1947           Teacher Mr. Charles Hilson
                    Assistant Ellen Hilson
                    Teacher Mr. Valli

 

1947?

Back Row L - R:   RAY LITTLELY, EDWARD MACRI, Teacher Mr. VALLI, BRUNO SONEGO, RON HALSE, LES SMITH, DAVID LEWIS.
 Middle Row L - R:  JEAN PRICE, (Facing left) DANITA PLOZZA, VALMER LITTLELY, ROMA SCARI, MARY HALSE, MARY SCARI, ALAN LEWIS, (Part hidden) ROSS NICHOLLS, DOMENICO MACRI
 Front Row L -R:          HALSE?, ROSA ITALIANO, VIOLA SONEGO, ANNA PLOZZA, ADA ITALIANO,           HALSE?, ELIZABETH FRETWELL, BOB SCARI
 Sitting L -R:   SHIRLEY LITTLELY, JANICE SCARI, STELLA ITALIANO, ANGELO GHILARDUCCI, RICHARD NICHOLLS, JIMMY SONEGO, CARLO GHILARDUCCI.  #18

 

1948            Teacher:  Mr. Joseph Shimmings
                     Assistant Jean Halse

 

1948

RARE PHOTO OF THE INTERIOR OF SCHOOL ROOM AT "ROCK INNE" SITE    #13

This Photo was taken before the second Classroom was added.       The three Junior Classes children faced the back of the room and the seats on the right were those of the bigger children, Grade 3 - 7 and they sat facing the front of the schoolroom where the Headmaster sat in front of the fireplace. The pictures on the blackboard were drawn by the lady teacher who had some wonderful drawing talent. The one of the horse (it looks like it had wings) was the white horse from the Poem:
 Ride a cock-horse to Banbury Cross,
 To see a fine lady upon a white horse:
 Rings on her fingers and bells on her toes,
 And she shall have music wherever she goes.

 

1949            Teacher Mr. William Muir
                     Assistant Dorothy Muir

 

1950            Teacher Mr. Thomas Moore
                     Assistant Kathleen Moore

Twentyseven children attending

 

1950

Back Row (L-R):    ANTHONY FRETWELL, TOM PRICE, CARLO GHILARDUCCI, JIM SONEGO, BRIAN LEWIS, DICK NICHOLS.
 Middle Row (L-R):    ELIZABETH FRETWELL, VIOLA SONEGO, LINA NATTA, MARIA DI DIO, VALMA LITTLELY,  ANGELINA DI DIO, ANNA PLOZZA.
 Front Row (L-R):     MARCIA FRETWELL, ADA ITALIANO, STELLA ITALIANO, DANITA PLOZZA, TERESA GHILARDUCCI, SHIRLEY LITTLELY, JANICE SCARI, LINA ITALIANA.
 Sitting (L-R):    BRUNO SONEGO, EDWARD MACRI, CEASER PERPOLI, ROSS NICHOLS, RAY LITTLELY,  BOB SCARI.  #7

 

1951              Teacher Mr. Thomas Moore  (Long Service Leave 31st July 1950 - 12th March 1951)
                       Teacher Mr. Bernard Bohan
                       Teacher Mr. Leon Williams
                       Assistant Caroline Hyman

 

1952             Teachers:  Mr. Bert Forrest
                                     Miss Dorothy Doepel   Assistant Teacher. She was a very experienced teacher who took voluntary retrogression to have a year without so much stress - teaching a small classs at Karragullen

Second Classroom opened at Rock Inne

Mr. BERT FORREST

 

1952

OPENING OF NEW "LITTLE ROOM" CLASSROOM
 PHOTO TAKEN BY MR. BERT FORREST HEADMASTER
 Adults & Clhildren in Back Row   L - R;    MRS. HIAM,          ?       , Baby HIAM, MRS WILFRED PRICE,         ?      .       ?         ,        ?         ,         ?       ,       ?       ,        ?       ,          ?      ,         ?          .
 Children in Front  L - R;                 (partly hidden),        ?        ,          ?       , ROBERT FORREST, ANTONETTA DELLA FRANCA,         ?     ,     ?     ,     ?    ,     ?     ,      ?     , BILL NICHOLLS (facing to right), ADA ITALIANO, ROSA ITALIANO, NOLA FORREST (white cardigan), SHIRLEY LITTLELY, MERYL SHARPE, STELLA ITALIANO,           ?            , SUZANNE O'MEAGHER extreme right partly missing      #28

 
 

 

1952

OPENING OF NEW "LITTLE ROOM" CLASSROOM
 PHOTO TAKEN BY MR. BERT FORREST HEADMASTER

Back Row L - R:  ANTHONY FRETWELL?, BILL NICHOLLS, SHIRLEY LITTLELY, STELLA ITALIANO, NOLA FORREST middle (white cardigan), ROSA ITALIANO, ADA ITALIANO.
 Front Row L - R:  ANTONATTA DELLA FRANCA,            ?        ROBERT FORREST, LENA ITALIANO, KEN LITTLELY, SUZANNE O'MEAGHER,  MERYL SHARPE.

#20

 

 

 

1952
KARRAGULLEN SCHOOL SPORTS TEAM 7th NOVEMBER 1952

Back Row L - R:     ?      NICHOLLS, TONY HITCHENS, NEIL CASOTTI, TOM PRICE, ANGELO GHILARDUCCI,        ?           , ANNA PLOZZA, BRIAN LEWIS, VIOLA SONEGO,        ?         ,   LUI DELLA FRANCA, ANTHONY FRETWELL, NOLA FORREST, RAY LITTLELY, RICHARD NICHOLLS, STELLA ITALIANO, EDWARD MACRI, JIMMY SONEGO, ANGELINA DI DIO, DANITA PLOZZA, TERESA GHILADUCCI, ADA ITALIANO, LINA CODA, ELIZABETH FRETWELL, JOE CODA, ROSA ITALIANO, ELIZABETH THOMPSON.
 Front L - R:  ROBERT THOMPSON, JANICE SCARI? ROSEMARIE THOMPSON, SARA THOMPSON, LEONIE CARTHEW? SUZANNE O'MEAGHER, MERYL SHARPE, LINA ITALIANO.
 Lying Down L - R:   KEN LITTLELY, ROBERT FORREST.  #19

 

                   

1952
KARRAGULLEN SCHOOL GIRLS WITH CHAMPION SCHOOL PENNANT AT INTER-SCHOOL SPORTS DAY, KALAMUNDA OVAL 11th NOVEMBER 1952  #16

Back Row L - R:   MARCIA FRETWELL, ANGELINA DI DIO, ELIZABETH FRETWELL, ELIZABETH THOMPSON, ANNA PLOZZA, LINA CODA, DANITA PLOZZA.
 Middle Row L- R:   STELLA ITALIANO, SHIRLEY LITTLELY, NOLA FORREST, ADA ITALIANO, TERESA GHILARDUCCI, VIOLA SONEGO.
 Front Row L - R:   ROSEMARY THOMPSON, NAOMI PRICE,      ?        , SARAH ITALIANO, SHIRLEY LITTLELY, JANICE HERBERT.
 Kneeling L - R:   MERYL SHARPE?, LINA ITALIANO, LEONIE CARTHEW,  BARBARA SHARPE.

 

1952
PHOTO TAKEN BY TEACHER MR. BERT FORREST, 3rd DECEMBER 1952   #15

Back Row L - R:  ANGELINA DI DIO, ELIZABETH THOMPSON, TERESA GHILARDUCCI, LINA CODA, ANNA PLOZZA.
 Middle Row L - R:  ROSEMARY THOMPSOM, CAROLYN HIAM, VIOLA SONEGO, ADA ITALIANO, STELLA ITALIANO, NOLA FORREST, ELIZABETH FRETWELL, LINA ITALIANO, DANITA PLOZZA, SHIRLEY LITTLELY, MARCIA FRETWELL.
 Front Row L - R:                     NICHOLLS?, BRIAN LEWIS, JIMMY SONEGO, BOB HITCHINS, NEIL CASOTTI, JOE CODA, CARLO GHILARDUCCI, RICHARD NICHOLLS, TONY HITCHINS,                        ANGELO GHILARDUCCI, BOB SCARI, RAY LITTLELY,  LUI DELLA FRANCA, TOM PRICE.

 

 

1953           Teachers:    Mr. Bert Forrest
                                     Miss Gretchen Loaring

 

1953 Classes 3, 4, 5 & 6

Back Row L - R:  DANITA PLOZZA, ADA ITALIANO, LINA CODA.
 Middle Row L - R:  ELIZABETH FRETWELL, SHIRLEY LITTLELY, NOLA FORREST, TERESA GHILARDUCCI, STELLA ITALIANO, VIOLA SONEGO.
 Front Row L - R:  MARCIA FRETWELL, JANICE HERBERT, LINA ITALIANO, CAROLYN HIAM.   #14

 

1953

CHAMPION SCHOOL AT THE INTER SCHOOL SPORTS DAY AT PICKERING BROOK 13th NOVEMBER
 Teachers BERT  FORREST, GRETCHEN LOARING
  #9

 

1953
CHAMPION SCHOOL AT THE INTER SCHOOL SPORTS DAY AT PICKERING BROOK 13th NOVEMBER
 Teachers BERT  FORREST, GRETCHEN LOARING  #17

Back Row L - R:  VIOLA SONEGO, STELLA ITALIANO, LINA CODA, ANGELO GHILARDUCCI, VALMA LITTLELY,          ?          , TERESA GHILARDUCCI, JIMMY SONEGO, Teacher BERT FORREST,                                        ?                 , DANITA PLOZZA.
 Middle Row L - R:   Teacher GRETCHEN LOARING, ELIZABETH FRETWELL, ADA ITALIANO, CARLO GHILARDUCCI, NEIL CASOTI, TOM PRICE, RICHARD NICHOLLS, LINA ITALIANO, NOLA FORREST, CAROLYN HIAM, JANICE HERBERT, ANTHONY FRETWELL,               ?            ,              ?              ,            ?             .
 Kneeling:   MARCIA FRETWELLL.
 Sitting L - R:                  ?         ,           ?            ,            ?          , SARAH ITALIANO,           ?            , SUZANNE O'MEAGHER,           ?             ,             ?            ,           ?           , ANTONIETTA DELLA FRANCA, ROBERT FORREST,           ?              , ANTHONY PUTLAND, BOB SCARI,               ?          ,          ?               ,             ?              .
                                                                              

 

1954            Teacher:     Mr. Smith

1954 Infants, Class 1 & 2

#23

 

 

1954

Back Row (L - R):   LOUI DELLA FRANCA, ANGELO GHILARDUCCI, NEIL CASOTTI.
 Middle Row (L - R):   BILL NICHOLS, ELENA ITALIANO, TERESA GHILARDUCCI, MARCIA FRETWELL, BOB DAVIES.
 Front Row (l - R):     MERYL SHARPE, SUSAN O'MEAGHER, LEONIE CARTHEW,  SARAH ITALIANO, JANICE HERBERT, CAROL HIAM, NAOMI PRICE.
 Sitting (L- R):   ANTHONY PUTLAND, TOM PRICE, ANTHONY FRETWELL, JIMMY SONEGO, BRIAN LEWIS, BOB HITCHINS.  #10

 

1955

KARRAGULLEN SCHOOL
 JOHN CRAVEN O'MEAGHER 1955-56     #27

 

1956

 

1957             Teachers:    Mr. Bernie Giles  Headmaster
                                       Lesley Stocker   Junior Teacher

 

1958             Teachers:    Mr. Bernie Giles  Headmaster
                                       D. Schwenke     Junior Teacher

 

1959            Teachers:    Mr. Bernie Giles  Headmaster
                                      Mr. Neil Earp      Relieving Headmaster
                                      Andrea George   Junior Teacher

 

1960            Teacher:     Mr. Bernie Gilles  Headmaster

 

1960c

Back Row L - R;  JOAN SIMPSON, LESLIE LITTLELY, SUSAN ROBINSON, MERYLE GILES, MARY FRETWELL, MAUREEN O'MEAGHER.
 Middle Row L - R:  MERLENE JOHNSON,  BETTY NICHOLLS, BARBARA SMAILES, ANTONETTA DELLA FRANCA, KATHY BATES, FAYE HUGHES .
 Front Row L - R:  GREG McKAY, MICHAEL O'MEAGHER, GRAHAM O'MEAGHER, GEORGE PUTLAND, ALLAN GILES, JOHN O'MEAGHER.

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1961           Teacher:      Mr. George Heatley      Headmaster

 

1962           Teacher:      Mr. George Heatley      Headmaster
                                      Miss Cross

                                      

DETAILED MAP OF SCHOOL GROUND LAYOUT. DRAWN BY STEPHANIE O'MEAGHER MAY 2010.

 

1962

Back Row L - R:    TONY BLASIO, MICHAEL O'MEAGHER, Teacher? MISS CROSS, LESLEY LITTLELY, STEPHANIE O'MEAGHER, LORRAINE MARTIN, Headmaster Mr. GEORGE HEATLEY, JOAN HIAM, MICHAEL TRANCHITA, OLIVIA GHILLARDUCCI, ROBERT GHILLARDUCCI.
 Middle Row L - R:  GAIL SCARI, MARY DI BLASIO, SHARON HEATLEY, DIANNE BOVANNI, MARLENE GHILLARDUCCI, BRIAN O'MEAGHER, DON SMAILES, JANE FRETWELL, GRAHAME PIERCE.
 Front Row L - R:  LAURA GHILLARDUCCI, CHERYL SCARI, DENISE NIELSON, DAVID HEATLEY, WENDY HEATLEY, JOHN HEATLEY, PHILLIP SMAILES, RON BATES, ROSEMARY O'MEAGHER,            ?       , BRIAN SMITH,                  ?                 .
 Sitting L - R:  STEVEN LA ROSA, JOSIE BAISI, FRANCIS-ANNE VISKOVICH, JOHN (ARTHUR) BATES.   #24

 

 

1963            Teacher:      Mr. George Heatley      Headmaster    

 

1964

 

1965      Principal  C. J. Vermy

 

1965c      

TAKEN BY BILL BETTENAY, VISITING FROM VICTORIA.
 IT IS BELIVED TO BE ONE OF THE LAST PHOTOS  OF THE SCHOOL WHICH WAS REMOVED BY THE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT FOR USE A DEMOUNTABLE CLASSROOM IN 1970C.

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1966      Principal  C. J. Vermy

 

1967      Principal  C. J. Vermy

New School built in Karragullen Townsite. Opened November
 
                          26 Children

 

1968      Principal  Mr. Smith

 

1969

Gretchen Forrest returns the old Karragullen School near Rock Inne where as a teacher in 1953 she met her future husband Bert Forrest who was the Headmaster at the time. The old School had been closed for some time and was showing signs of neglect. She is pictured with their three children.

 

Left - Right:  KIM, LYN, GRETCHEN & JUDITH FORREST IN THE OLD KARRAGULLEN SCHOOL GROUND NEAR THE ROCK INNE   #31

 

1970     33 Children

 

1971     Extra Classroom added

                 Extra teacher added

 

1972

 

1973

 

1974

 

1975

 

1976

 

1977

 

1978

ARTICLE IN THE "ROLEYSTONE COURIER" ISSUE DATED MAY 1978 REPORTED THE FOLLOWING:

NO O'MEAGHERS IN SCHOOL

For the first time in 55 years there are no O'Meagher children in the Karragullen School this year.

There has been an unbroken line of O'Meaghers since 1923 when Jack O'Meagher was enrolled. His generation ended with Malcolm who was joined by the first of the next generation. This was Janice Scari. Although she doesn't bear the O'Meagher surname she was John senior's granddaughter and was raised by her grand parents.

Some of the O'Meagher wives had seven children and at one stage in the tiny school there were six of the clan.

The school was originally built at Illawarra orchard but was later moved to the site of the Rock Inne. The new one was built about ten years ago.
 

#29

 

1979

1979

Back Row  (L - R):   ERIC GHILARDUCCI, IVAN TENHAVE, KYLIE CUNNINGHAM?, SARINA FIOLO, RAELENE LITTLELY, TONY ZINO, MARK JOHNSON.
 Middle Row (L - R):   JEREMY PRICE, BRIAN PUTLAND, ROSS ZINO, JOHN VETTA, PAUL LITTLELY, ERIC FARANCE, KIM ROSS, JOHN DELLA FRANCA, SEBASTIAN FIOLO.
 Front Row  (L - R):  DONNA DELLA FRANCA, JANINA MACRI, JULIE BAXTER, MERANDA GHILARDUCCI, MELISSA PRICE, RITA FIOLO, KERREE CUNNINGHAM, NATALIE PUTLAND, CATHERINE GHILARDUCCI, FIONA GHILARDUCCI, SONIA MACRI.

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1980

 

1981           Principal  Mr. Trainor
                                 Margaret Pope          Pre-primary, Years 1 2,3
                                 Margaret Sutherland  Pre-primary, Years 1,2,3
                                 Mr. Trainor  Years     4,5,6, & 7

 

1981 Pre-Primary & Years 1, 2, 3

Back Row (L-R):  RODNEY ROSS, MARIO CASOTTI, ERIC GHILARDUCCI, GULLIVER ERICSON, MARK JOHNSON, SONIA MACRI, ISAAC HOWE.
 Middle Row (L-R): ZACHARY MARSHALL, BRADLEY ROSS, DAVID DELLA FRANCA, LORENZO RUCCHIN, IVAN TENHAVE, LUCY GHILARDUCCI, JENNY DELLA FRANCA, PAUL FARANDA.
 Front Row (L-R):  MEAGAN POULTNEY, SHARYN LITTLELY, NINA TENHAVE, CAROLYN GHILARDUCCI, FIONA GHILARDUCCI, DONNA DELLA FRANCA, TANYA DANNOCK,
 EMMA ROBINSON, AMANDA PETERS.
 Teachers: MARGARET POPE, MARGARET SUTHERLAND
.

                                                                                                                                         (Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1981 Years 4, 5, 6 & 7

Back Row (L-R):  ROSS ZIINO, PAUL LITTLELY, JOHN VETTA.
 Middle Row (L-R):  SEBASTIAN FIOLO, JEREMY PRICE, JULIE BAXTER, KIM ROSS, JOHN DELLA FRANCA, TONY ZIINO.
 Front Row (L-R):  JANINA MACRI, MERANDA GHILARDUCCI, KERREE CUNNINGHAM, RAELENE LITTLELY, MELISSA PRICE, CATHERINE GHILARDUCCI.
 Teacher:  MR. TRAINER (Principal).

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1982            Principal  Mr. John Henry
                                  Mrs. Pope
                                  Mrs. Sutherland

 

 

  1982 Whole School

Back Row (L-R):  ARDIAN O'MEAGHER, BRADLEY ROSS, PAUL GHILARDUCCI, JOE ROGERS, KIM ROSS, GULLIVER ERICKSON, SEBASTIAN FIOLO, JACOB HENRY, DAVID DELLA FRANCA, ZACHARI MARSHALL.
 Middle Row (L-R):  SHARON ROGERS, CAROLYN GHILARDUCCI, FIONA GHILARDUCCI, JULIE BAXTER, MERANDA GHILARDUCCI, MONICA HENRY, CATHERINE GHILARDUCCI, JANINA MACRI, DONNA DELLA FRANCA, LUCY GHILARDUCCI, SONIA MACRI.
 Front Row (L-R):  RODNEY ROSS, LORENZO RUCCHIN, TONY ZIINO, ERIC GHILARDUCCI, JEREMY PRICE, JOHN DELLA FRANCA, IVAN TENHAVE, MARK JOHNSON, MARIO CASOTTI, PAUL FARANDA.
 Sitting (L-R):  JULIET SEWELL, AMBER YORK, REBECCA GREEN, ASTRA JOYNT, NINA TENHAVE, JENNIFER DELLA FRANCA, AMANDA PETERS, SHARON LITTLELY, LEANNE EVERY, MEGAN POULTNEY.
 Teachers (L-R):   Mrs. POPE, Mr. JOHN HENRY Principal, Mrs. Sutherland.

(Photo supplied by Meranda Bothwell)

 

1983          Principal  Mr. John Henry
                                Mrs. Noni Tenhave       Pre-primary, Years 1 & 2
                                B. Shipley                   Pre-primary, Years 1 & 2
                                Mrs. Trevaskis             Years 3 & 4

 

1983 Pre-Primary & Years 1, 2

Back Row (L-R):  REBECCA GREEN, SHARON LITTLELY, CAROLYN GHILARDUCCI, ROSANNA FERARO.
 Middle Row (L-R):  JAI YORK, JULES PICKFORD, PAUL FARANDA, PHILIP DELLA FRANCA, PAUL GHILARDUCCI, ZACHARI MARSHALL, ADRIAN O'MEAGHER, RODNEY ROSS, PHILLIP LITTLELY, PAUL EVERY.
 Front Row (L-R): TRACIE O'MEAGHER, LISA POULTNEY, AMBER YORK, LEANNE EVERY, AMANDA PETERS, MEGAN POULTNEY, LEANNE GIUMELLI, JOSEPHINE, KATRINA FARANDA.
 Teachers:  Mrs NONI TENHAVE & B. SHIPLEY.

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1983 Years 3 & 4

Back Row (L-R): JASON TEARNE, CHRISTINA PUTLAND, LUCINDA GHILARDUCCI, RAYMOND PUTLAND.
 Middle Row (L-R):  DAVID DELLAFRANCA, BRADLEY ROSS, LORENZO RUCCHIN, MARIO CASOTTI.
 Front Row (L-R):  NINA TENHAVE
 Teacher:  Mrs. TREVASKIS

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1984  

Principal: Mr John Henry
             Mrs. Noni Tenhave  Pre-Primary & Years 1, 2
             Mrs. Margaret Pope Pre-Primary & Years 1, 2
             Mrs. Kingsley          Pre-Primary & Years 1, 2
             Mrs. Ford              Years 3 & 4
             Mr. John Henry      Years 5, 6 & 7

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1984 Pre-Primary & Years1,  2

Back Row (L-R):   ADRIAN O'MEAGHER, PHILIP DELLAFRANCA, PHILLIP LITTLELY.
 Middle Row (L-R):  KATRINA FARANDA, PINA FERRARO, ROSANNA FERRARO, TRACIE O'MEAGHER, REBECCA GREEN, LISA POULTNEY.
 Front Row (L-R):  ALBERTO FERRARO, SAM MARSHALL, CHARLES BATEY, BEAU HUMPHREYS, LANCE GHILADUCCI, JASON WAUCHOPE.
 Teachers:   Mrs. NONI TENHAVE, Mrs. MARGARET  POPE & Mrs. KINGSLEY.

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1984 Years 3 & 4

Back Row (L-R):  PAUL FARANDA, PAUL GHILARDUCCI, MARIO CASOTTI, DAVID DELLAFRANCA, RAYMOND PUTLAND, ADAM SHIPLEY, TONY FERRARO, ZACHARI MARCHALL.
 Front Row (L-R):  AMANDA PETERS, NINA TENHAVE, LUCY GHILARDUCCI, WENDY WAUCHOPE, CAROLYN GHILARDUCCI, SHARON LITTLELY, MEGAN POULTNEY.
 Teacher:   Mrs. FORD.

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1984 Years 5, 6 & 7

Back Row (L-R):  JASON TEARNE, JACOB HENRY, JEREMY PRICE, GULLIVER ERICKSON, KIM ROSS, SEBASTIAN FIOLO, MARK JOHNSON.
 Middle Row (L-R):   BRADLEY ROSS, ERIC GHILARDUCCI, IVAN TENHAVE, JOHN DELLAFRANCA, T HUMPHREYS, LORENZO RUCCHIN.
 Front Row (L-R):  CHRISTINA PUTLAND, KERRY MANSER, CATHERINE GHILARDUCCI, DONNA DELLAFRANCA, FIONA GHILARDUCCI, CATHY MANSER, SONIA MACRI.
 Teacher:  Mr. JOHN HENRY
(Principal)

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1984 Year 7

Back Row: (L-R):  KIM ROSS. SEBASTIAN FIOLO.
 Front Row (L-R):  KERRY MANSER, JOHN DELLAFRANCA, JEREMY PRICE, CATHERINE GHILARDUCCI.

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1985            Principal  Mr. John Henry
                                  Mrs. Lynn          Years 4 & 4
                                  Mr. John Henry   Years 5, 6 & 7

 

1985 Years 3 & 4

Back Row (L-R):   ROSANNA FERRARO, TONY FERRARO, CAROLYN GHILARDUCCI, PAUL GHILARDUCCI.
 Middle Row (L-R):   SIMON BARNES, PAUL FARANDA, RODNEY ROSS, ADRIAN O'MEAGHER, ZACHARIMARSHALL.
 Front Row (L-R):  LEANNE EVERY, REBECCA GREEN, SHARON LITTLELY, WENDY WAUCHOPE.
 Teacher:   Mrs. LYNN.

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1985 Years 5, 6 & 7

Back Row (L-R):  SETH HARKNESS, JUAN TENHAVE, FIONA GHILARDUCCI, GULLIVER ERICKSON, ERIC GHILARDUCCI.
 Middle Row (L-R):  JACOB HENRY, NINA TENHAVE, SONIA MACRI, CATHY MANSER, DONNA DELLA FRANCA, LUCY GHILARDUCCI, CHRISTINE PUTLAND, RAYMOND PUTLAND.
 Front Row (L-R):  MARIO CASOTTI, LORENZO RUCCHIN, JASON TEARNE, ADAM BARNES, MARK JOHNSON, ADAM SHIPLEY, DAVID DELLA FRANCA, BRADLEY ROSS.
 
Teacher:   Mr. JOHN HENRY (Principal)

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1986

 

1987

                          Below is a picture published in Comment News on December 22nd, 1987. It does not reproduce very well but it is the best we have at the moment. The attached caption reads:
                         "OUR LAST FOR YEAR"
                         Our final school photo for the year is Karragullen Primary School.
                         All 55 students, from pre-primary to Years 7s, posed for the photograph at their school - set in picturesque bush surroundings.                         The school has been on the site in School Road since about 1969
(actually it was 1967). Before that it was near the Rock Inne                         Tavern on Brookton Highway.

 

1987 Pre-Primary, Years 1,2,3,4,5,6 & 7

 

1988

 

1988

#11

 

1989            Principal   Mr. John Henry
                                   Mrs. Morris             Pre-Primary
                                   Mrs Noni Tenhave    Pre-Primary
                                   Mrs. Moulds           Years 1 & 2
                                   Mrs. Perry             Years 3 & 4
                                   Mr. John Henry       Years 5, 6 & 7

 

1989     

PICTURE OF SCHOOL GROUND SHOWING BASKKETBALL COURT AND TANK STAND

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1989 Pre-Primary

Back Row (L-R):   CARMEN LAMMERS, BRADLEY O'MEAGHER, CLINT MARTIN, CHRIS GHILARDUCCI, JULIAN CHADBOURNE, KAREN HARRIS, GINA FERRARO.
 Front Row (L-R):   PHOEBE DAVIS, STEPHEN SPRY, LUKE OLIVER, LISA ARMSTRONG, STACEY FULLER, RENEE WALKER, RICHELLE WILLS.
 Teachers:  Mrs. MORRIS & Mrs. NONI TENHAVE.

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1989 Years 1 & 2

Back Row (L-R):  ERIKA DOETSCH, EBONY SMAILES, ASHA GREENWAY, EMILY CHAPMAN.
 Middle Row (L-R):   CHRISTIE CUNNINGHAM BRANWEN BEGLEY, VERITY OWEN, BRIAN STAFFORD, KATHLEEN PUTLAND, JESSICA PROCTOR, SHANNON POOL.
 Front Row (L-R):  MARTIN TOMEO, DANIEL ENGEL, BEN OLIVER, SCOTT VICKERS, ANTHONY CASSETTA, DANIEL O'MEAGHER, GAVIN GHILARDUCCI.
 Absentee:  ASHER ERICKSON.
 Teacher:  Mrs. D. MOULD.

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1989 Years 3 & 4

Back Row (L-R):   BELINDA O'MEAGHER, MARGARET GHILARDUCCI, RACHAEL BRYDEN, GAYNOR OWEN, SARAH CACCETTA, BROOKE VICKERS.
 Middle Row (L-R):  ANNE FARANDA, NATALIE BIRT, LUKE HOWE, GABRIELLE LAMMERS, SHANNON CHAPMAN, RACHAEL DELLAFRANCA, SOPHIASTAFFORD, KERRI ARMSTRONG.
 Front Row (L-R):   PETER TOMEO, ROSS ENGEL, RYAN O,MEAGHER, ANTHONY ARENA, STEVEN MORTIMER, BENN PROCTOR, DAVID SPRY, ANDREW GHILARDUCCI.
 Absentee:   CATHERINE GREEN.
 
Teacher:  Mrs. PERRY

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1989 Years 5, 6 & 7

Back Row (L-R):  JASON WAUCHOPE, ADRIAN O'MEAGHER, REBECCA GREEN, ROSANNA FERRARO, PHILIP DELLA_FRANCA, SAM MARSHALL.
 Front Row (L-R):  BRANDON MARTIN, PINA FERRARO, ANDREW SPRY, PHILLIP LITTLELY, TRACIE O'MEAGHER, ALBERTO FERRARO, KATRINA FARANDA.
 Absentee:   CHARLES BATEY.
 Teacher:   Mr. JOHN HENRY (Principal).

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1990            Principal     Mr. John Henry

 

1991            Principal     Mr. John Henry

 

1991 Pre-Primary & year 1

(SORRY NO NAMES AVAILABLE)

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1991 Years 1 & 2.

(SORRY NO NAMES AVAILABLE)

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

\

1991  Years 4 & 5.

(SORRY NO NAMES AVAILABLE)

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1991  Years 6 & 7.

(SORRY NO NAMES AVAILABLE)

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1992            Principal   Mr. John Henry
                                   Mrs. Noni Tenhave  Pre-Primary & Year 1
                                   Miss J. Westbrook   Pre-Primary & Year 1
                                   Mrs. D. Moulds       Years 2 & 3
                                   Mrs. M Perry          Years 4 & 5
                                   Mrs. Hoffman         Years 6 & 7
                                   Mr. John Henry       Years 6 & 7

 

1992 Pre-Primary & Year1

Back Row (L-R):   FRANCESCA FERRARO, SANDEE O'MEAGHER, REBEKA DOETSCH, KATE ARMSTRONG, MICHELLE KAIN, ESTHER BROCKWAY.
 Middle Row (L-R):   JAYKE DELLAFRANCA, MICHAEL CAMPBELL, JOSHUACASSETTA, JORDAN LAMMERS, RODNEY POOL, ASHLEY RUCK, DANIEL SPRY, ETHAN ERICKSON.
 Front Row (L-R):   LISA THATCHER, BEVIN ERICKSON, HOLLY SMAILES, CHLOE MORTIMER, HEIDI DOETSCH, ANELEISE ROBERTSON, AMY CACCETTA.
 Teachers:    Mrs. NONI TENHAVE & Miss J. WESTBRROK

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1992 Years 2 & 3

Back Row (L-R):   BRADLEY O'MEAGHER, CHRISTOPHER GHILARDUCCI, BENJAMIN DI MARCO.
 Middle Row (L-R):   ANTHONY FARANDA, WAYNE GHILARDUCCI, STEPHEN SPRY, LUKE OLIVER, DANIEL CHAPMAN, ADAM BELL, ROBERT TOMEO, MATTHEW SMAILES.
 Front Row (L-R):   JENNNA O'MEAGHER, LISA ARMSTRONG, GINA FERRARO, CARMEN LAMMERS, STACEY FULLER,GEORGINA SMITH.
 Teacher:  Mrs. D. MOULDS.

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1992 Years 4 & 5

Back Row (L-R):  EMMA CHAPMAN, ASHA GREENWAY, DAVID ARMSTRONG, EBONY SMAILES, ERIKA DOETSCH.
 Middle Row (L-R):   ANDREW ELLIOTT, GAVIN GHILARDUCCI, ANTHONY CACCETTA, BEN OLIVER, BRIANSTAFFORD, AARON KAIN, DANIEL O'MEAGHER, MARTIN TOMEO.
 Front Row (L-R):   VERITY OWEN, JESSICA PROCTOR, EMILY CHAPMAN, KATHLEEN PUTLAND, ASHER ERICKSON,SHANNON POOL.
 Absentee:    DANIEL ENGEL.
 Teacher:   Mrs. M. PERRY.

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1992 Years 6 & 7

Back Row (L-R):   RACHAEL DELLAFRANCA, YVETTE ASHLIN, SHANNON CHAPMAN, GAYNOR OWEN, KAMMA CHAPMAN, JOHANNA PERRY, MARGARET GHILARDUCCI.
 Middle Row (L-R):   PETER TOMEO, RONALD RAWLES, BENN PROCTOR, CATHERINE GREEN, RYAN O'MEAGHER, DAVID SPRY, ANDREW GHILARDUCCI.
 Front Row (L-R):   KERRI ARMSTRONG, REBECCA SMITH, GABRIELLE LAMMERS, BELINDA O'MEAGHER, SARAH CACCETA, SOPHIASTAFFORD, NATALIE BIRT, ANNE FARANDA.
 Teachers:    Mrs. HOFFMAN & Mr. JOHN HENRY (Principal).

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1993            Principal    Mr. John Henry
                                    Miss J. Westbrook     Pre-Primary & year 1
                                    Mrs. Noni Tenhave    Pre-Primary & year 1 Aide
                                    Mrs. I Falcon           Years 2 & 3
                                    Mrs. M. Perry           Years 4 & 5
                                    Mrs. Pope                Years 6 & 7
                                    Mr. John Henry         Years 6 & 7

 

1993 Pre-Primary & Year 1

Back Row (L-R):   HEIDI DOETSCH, CHLOE MORTIMER, KELLYMAHON, TESSA BETTENAY, AMY CALLETTA.
 Middle Row (L-R):   EMMA WINCHCOMBE, REBECCA GHILARDUCCI, BEVIN ERICKSON, HOLLY SMAILES, JESSICA FARANDA, LISA THATCHER.
 Front Row (L-R):   MICHAEL FARANDA, JAYKE DELLAFRANCA, MICHAEL CAMPBELL, PAUL McGOVERN, ASHLEY RUCK, DANIEL SPRY, ETHAN ERICKSON, CAMERON RUCK.
 Teacher:    Miss J. WESTBROOK.
 Teachers Aide:    Mrs. NONI TENHAVE.

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1993 Years 2 & 3

Back Row (L-R):    WAYNE GHILARDUCCI, ROBERT TOMEO, RODNEY POOL, ADAM BELL.
 Middle Row (L-R):   JOSHUA CACCETTA, ADAM EMMANUEL, ANTHONYFARANDA,JORDAN LAMMERS, MATTHEW SMAILES.
 Front Row (L-R):   FRANCESCA FERRARO, ESTHER BROCKWAY, MICHELLE KAIN, REBEKA DOETSCH, KATE ARMSTRONG, JENNA O'MEAGHER,GEORGINA SMITH.
 Absentees:     DANIEL CHAPMAN, SANDY O'MEAGHER.
 Teacher:    Mrs. I. FALCON

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1993 Years 4 & 5

Back Row (L-R):    ASHER ERIKSON, EMMA CHAPMAN, KATHLEEN PUTLAND, ERIKA DOETSCH, ANTHONY CACETTA, DANIEL ENGEL, CORY LEWIS, EMILY CHAPMAN.
 Middle Row (L-R):   STEPHEN SPRY, LUKE OLIVER, BRADLEY O'MEAGHER, GAVIN GHILARDUCCI, CHRISTOPHER GILLARDUCCI, ANDREW ELLIOTT, MARTIN TOMEO.
 Front Row (L-R):    STACEY FULLER, SHANNON POOL, LISA ARMSTRONG, GINA FERRARO, CARMEN LAMMERS, JESSICA PROCTOR, JESSICA EMMANUEL.
 Teacher:   Mrs. M. PERRY.

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1993  Years 6 & 7

Back Row (L-R):   MARGARET GHILARDUCCI, JOHANNA PERRY, SHANNON CHAPMAN, YVETTE ASHLIN.
 Middle Row (L-R):    JESSICA BENNETT, SARAH CACCETTA, MELENIE ANDREW, ASHA GREENWAY, BELINDA O'MEAGHER, JODIE LEWIS.
 Front Row (L-R):    DANIEL O'MEAGHER, AARON KAIN, DAVID SPRY, BEN OLIVER, DAVID ARMSTRONG, BRIAN STAFFORD, ROSS ENGEL, PETER TOMEO, ANDREW GHILARDUCCI.
 Sitting (L-R):  VERITY OWEN, EBONY SMAILES, NATALIE BIRT, REBECCA SMITH, GABRIELLE LAMMERS, KERRI ARMSTRONG, ANNE FARANDA.
 Teachers:   Mrs. POPE & Mr. JOHN HENRY (Principal).

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1994            Principal  Mr. John Henry
                                 Miss J. Westbrook       Pre-Primary & year 1
                                 Mrs Noni Tenhave       Pre-Primary & year 1 Assistant
                                 Mrs. Moulds               Years 2 & 3
                                 Mrs. M. Perry             Years 4 & 5
                                 Mrs. Helen Cotter       Years 6 & 7
                                 Mr. John Henry          Years 6 & 7

 

EDUCATION WEEK  1994  

Ladies from St. Louis Retirement Village
 PETER TOMBO (12) , KERRI ARMSTRONG (12), ANNE FARANDA (12), BELINDA O'MEAGHER (12).
Mrs. DOREEN COOLING & Mrs. EILEEN BENSON of Claremont.

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1994 Pre-Primary & Year 1

Back Row (L-R):    MATTHEW COLLETT, MICHAEL FARANDA, JESSICA FARANDA, TESSA BETTENAY, EMMA WINCHCOMBE, SCOTT CAMPBELL.
 Front Row (L-R):   MEGAN BLAKELEY, MATTHEW MORTIMER, TRACEY KERSHAW, ALEXANDRA SMITH, SCOTT BELL, ADRIANNA DELLA FRABCA, CAMERON RUCK.
 Absentees:   REBECCA GHILARDUCCI, PETER GHILARDUCCI.
 Teacher:    Miss J. WESTBROOK.
 Teachers Aide:  Mrs. NONI TENHAVE.

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1994 Years 2 & 3

Back Row (L-R):    ASHLEY McCORMACK, KATIE BRYDEN, MICHELLE KAIN, RODNEY POOL, REBEKA DEOTSCH, SANDEE O'MEAGHER, PAUL McGOVERN, MICHAEL CAMPBELL.
 Middle Row (L-R):   NICHOLAS KEMP, JAYKE DELLA FRANCA, ASHLEY RUCK, JOSHUA CACCETTA, KATE ARMSTRONG, JORDAN LAMMERS, DANIEL SPRY, ETHAN ERICKSON, DARREN KERSHAW.
 Front Row (L-R):   SEAN BLAKELEY, LISA THATCHER, AMY CACCETTA, HEIDI DOETSCH, ESTHER BROCKWAY, FRANCESCA FERRARO, CHLOE MORTIMER, BEVAN ERICKSON, HOLLY SMAILES, RICHARD MASON.
 Teacher:   Mrs. MOULDS.

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1994 Years 4 & 5

Back Row (L-R):   LUKE OLIVER, ANDREW WHITTINGTON, CORY LEWIS, CHRISTOPHER GHILARDUCCI, DANIEL CHAPMAN.
 Middle Row (L-R):    MATTHEW SMAILES, ANTHONY FARANDA, ADAM BELL, ROBERT TOMEO, BRADLEY O'MEAGHER, REON NORRIS, ADAM EMMANUEL,WAYNE GHILARDUCCI.
 Front Row (L-R):   GEORGINA SMITH, JENNA O'MEAGHER, CARMEN LAMMERS, BERNARD McCORMACK, STEPHEN SPRY, GINA FERRARO, STACEY FULLER, NATALIE MASON.
 Teacher:    Mrs. M. PERRY.

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1994 Years 6 & 7

Back Row (L-R):   EBONY SMAILES, BEN OLIVER, ASHA GREENWAY, DAVID ARMSTRONG, ERIKA DOETSCH, BRIAN STAFFORD.
 Middle Row (L-R):   MARTIN TOMEO, DANIEL O'MEAGHER, GAVIN GHILARDUCCI, ANTHONY CACCETTA, PETER VAN GERREVINK, AARON KEIN, DANIEL ENGEL, ANDREW ELLIOTT.
 Front Row (L-R):   SHANNON POOL, JESS PROCTOR, EMILY CHAPMAN, EMMA CHAPMAN, ASHER ERICKSON, KATHLEEN PUTLAND, JESSICA EMMANUEL, VERITY OWEN.
 Teachers:    Mr. JOHN HENRY (Principal)  & Mrs. HELEN COTTER.

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1995            Principal   Mr. Colin Brown
                                   Mrs. Nicole Gardner        Pre-Primary & year 1
                                   Mrs. Noni Tenhave         Pre-Primary & year 1
                                   Mrs. D. Moulds              Years 2 & 3
                                   Mr. Colin Brown             Years 4 & 5
                                   Mrs. Helen Cotter          Years 4 & 5
                                   Mrs. Sheliagh Fitzpatrick Years 6 & 7

 

1995 Pre-Primary & Year 1

Back Row (L-R):   MATTHEW MORTIMER, SCOTT BELL, JAIMEE LEE COTTRELL, ALEXANDRA SMITH, SCOTT CAMPBELL, PETER GHILARDUCCI.
 Middle Row (L-R):    MARK CACCETTA, LEIGHTON COTTER, DANIEL AGOSTINELLI, ALEX THATCHER, SHELDON RUCK, MARK BINGLEY, LEAGON PANZRAM.
 Front Row (L-R):   ADRIANA DELLA FRANCA, CELESTE ZAVATTERRI, JASMINE SQUIRE, SHARN ASHTON, AMY COLLETT, MEGAN BLAKELY, EMMA MORTIMER.
 Absentee:    NATALIE SMAILES.
 Teachers:    Mrs. NICOLE GARDNER & Mrs. NONI TENHAVE.

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1995 Years 2 & 3

Back Row (L-R):    HEIDI DOETSCH, ASHLEY RUCK, ASHLEY McCORMACK, AMY CACCETTA. TESSA BETTENAY, MICHAEL CAMPBELL, DANIEL SPRY, CHLOE MORTIMER.
 Middle Row (L-R):   CAMERON RUCK, MICHAEL, JAYKE DELLA FRANCA, LUKE BRYAN, NATHAN SQUIRE, MATTHEW COLLET.
 Front ROW (L-R):   EMMA WINCHCOMBE, HOLLY SMAILES, BEVIN ERICKSON, JESSICA FARANDA, REBECCA GHILARDUCCI, LISA THATCHER.
 Absentees:   SEAN BLAKELY, JACINTA BERNARDI.
 Teacher:   Mrs. D. MOULDS.

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1995  Years 4 & 5

Back Row (L-R):    REBEKA DOETSCH, RODNEY POOL, DANIEL CHAPMAN, KATHRYN ARMSTRONG.
 Middle Row (L-R):   ADAM EMMANUEL, ANTHONY FARANDA, WAYNE GHILARDUCCI, ADAM BELL, JORDAN LAMMERS, JOSHUA CACCETTA, MATTHEW SMAILES.
 Front Row (L-R):   FRANCESCA FERRARO, KATIE BRYDEN, ESTHER BROCKWAY, SANDEE O'MEAGHER, GEORGINA SMITH, two names missing.
 Absentees:    BERNARD McCORMACK, REON NORRIS.
 Teachers:   Mr. COLIN BROWN (Principal) , Mrs. HELEN COTTER.

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1995  Years 6 & 7

Back Row (L-R):   EMMA CHAPMAN, KATHLEEN PUTLAND, ANTHONY CACCETTA, ERIKA DOETSCH, ASHER ERICKSON.
 Middle Row (L-R):   STEPHEN SPRY, LUKE OLIVER, BRADLEY O'MEAGHER, CORY LEWIS, GAVIN GHILARDUCCI, ANDREW ELLIOTT, MARTIN TOMEO.
 Front Row (L-R):   JESSICA EMMANUEL, SHANNAN POOL, EMILY CHAPMAN, GINA FERRARO, CARMEN LAMMERS, JESS PROCTOR, STACEY FULLER.
 Absentee:   ANDREW WHITTINGTON.
 Teacher:  Mrs. SHELIAGH FITZPATRICK.

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1996            Principal    Mr. Colin Brown   
                                    Mrs. Stephanie Humphreys  Pre-Primary & years 1, 2
                                    Mrs. Nonie Tenhave           Pre-Primary & years 1, 2
                                    Mrs. Helen Cotter              Years 3 & 4
                                    Mr. Colin Brown                 Years 3 & 4
                                    Miss Helen Atherton           Years 5, 6 & 7

 

1996 Pre-Primary & Years 1 & 2

Back Row (L-R):   ALEX THATCHER, DANIEL AGOSTINELLI, JACINTA BERNARDI, SCOTT CAMPBELL, ALEXANDRA SMITH, SCOTT BELL, NATALIE SMAILES.
 Middle Row (L-R):   MARK CACCETTA, TIMOTHY SQUIRE, MARK BINGLEY, MATTHEW MORTIMER, MATTHEW FARANDA, SHELDON RUCK, JACK BETTENAY, LEIGHTON COTTER.
 Front Row:   VANESSA SALPIETRO, SHANNON BURCOYNE, MEGAN BLAKELEY, CELESTE ZAVATTERI, JASMINR SQUIRE, ADRIANNA DELLA FRANCA, EMMA MORTIMER, VICTORIA SMITH.
 Teachers:  Mrs. STEPHANIE HUMPHREYS & Mrs. NONIE TENHAVE.

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1996 Years 3 & 4

Back Row (L-R):  ASHLEY McCORMACK, CHLOE MORTIMER, MICHAEL CAMPBELL, TESSA BETTENAY, ASHLEY RUCK.
 Middle Row (L-R):   NATHAN SQUIRE, SEAN BLAKELEY, JAYKE DELLA FRANCA, DANIEL SPRY, MICHAEL FARANDA, CAMERON RUCK.
 Front Row (L-R):   JESSICA FARANDA, HOLLY SMAILES, HEIDI DOETSCH, EMMA WINCHCOMBE, BEVIN ERICKSON, AMY CACCETTA, LISA THATCHER.
 Teachers:   Mr. COLIN BROWN  (Principal) & Mrs. HELEN COTTER.

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1996 Years 5, 6 & 7

Back Row (L-R):   RODNEY POOL, LUKE OLIVER, DANIEL CHAPMAN, GINA FERRARO, ANDREW WHITTINGTON, BERNARD McCORMACK.
 Middle Row (L-R):   MATTHEW SMAILES, JOSHUA CACCETTA, JORDAN LIMMERS, STEPHEN SPRY, ANTHONY FARANDA, ADAM EMMANUEL.
 Front Row (L-R):  ESTHER BROCKWAY, REBEKA DOETSCH, STACEY FULLER, CARMEN LAMMERS, JENNA O'MEAGHER, MICHELLE KAIN.
 Absentees:  FRANCESCA FERRARO, ADAM BELL.
 Teacher:   Miss HELEN ATHERTON.

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1996 STAFF

Back Row (L-R):   Miss HELEN ATHERTON, Mrs. NONI TENHAVE, Mrs. PENNY ROGAN, PAMELA BUNTON.
 Front Row (L-R):   CATH DELLA FRANCA, Mrs. HELEN COTTER, Mr. COLIN BROWN (Principal), Mrs. STEPHANIE HUMPHREYS.

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1997               Principal   Mr. Colin Brown
                                          Mrs. Humphries           Pre-Primary & years 1, 2
                                          Mrs. Noni Tenhave      Pre-Primary & years 1, 2
                                          Mrs. Helen Cotter        Years 3 & 4
                                          Mr. Colin Brown           Years 3 & 4
 
                                Mrs. H. Atherton       Years 5, 6 & 7

 

1997 Pre-Primary & 1, 2

Back Row (L-R):   EMMA MORTIMER, CELESTE ZAVATTERI, MATTHEW FARANDA, NATALIE SMAILES, VICTORIA SMITH, SHELDON RUCK.
 Middle Row (L-R):   GLEN McCORMACK, TIMOTHY SQUIRE, MARK BINGLEY, DANIEL AQOSTINELLI, ALEX THATCHER, JACK BETTENAY, MATHEW AGOSTINELLI, LEIGHTON COTTER, NEIL BINGLEY.
 Front Row (L-R):   ALANNA BLAKELEY, MELISSA O'KEEFFE, GABRIELLA ZAVATTERI, ANTONIA FARANDA, SANDRA TCHORZEWSKI, SHANNON BURGOYNE, TANIA GHILARDUCCI, MARISSA COTTER, VANESSA SALPIETRO.
 Teachers:   Mrs. STEPHANIE HUMPHREYS & Mrs. NONI TENHAVE.

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1997 Years 3 & 4

Back Row (L-R):    CAMERON RUCK, SCOTT BELL, GRANT MORAS, TESSA BETTENAY, NATHAN SQUIRE, SCOTT CAMPBELL, MICHAEL FARANDA.
 Front Row (L-R):   MEGAN BLAKELEY, JACINTA BERNARDI, JESSICA FARANDA, ASHLEY CASBOLT, EMMA WINCHCOMBE, ALEXANDRA SMITH, JASMINE SQUIRE.
 Absentee:   MATTHEW MORTIMER.
 Teachers:    Mr. COLIN BROWN  (Principal) & Mrs. HELEN COTTER (Absent)

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1997 Years 5, 6 & 7

Back Row (L-R):   SEAN BLAKELEY, ANTHONY FARANDA, ADAM BELL, BERNARD McCORMACK, JOSHUA CACCETTA, ADAM EMMANUEL.
 Middle Row (L-R):   MATTHEW SMAILES, MICHAEL CAMPBELL, JORDAN LAMMERS, JAMES HOLDER, HOLLY SMAILES, ASHLEY RUCK.
 Front Row (L-R):   HEIDI DOETSCH, FRANCESCA FERRARO, DANIEL SPRY, ASHLEY McCORMACK, REBEKA DOETSCH, LISA THATCHER.
 Abentees:   CHLOE MORTIMER, AMY CACCETTA.
 Teacher:    Miss HELEN ATHERTON.

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1997 STAFF

Back Row (L-R):   Miss HELEN ATHERTON, Mrs. PENNY ROGAN, Mrs. NONI TENHAVE, PAMELA BUNTON.
 Front Row (L-R):  CATH DELLA FRANCA, Mrs. CLAUDIA CHAPMAN, Mr. COLIN BROWN (Principal), STEPHANIE HUMPHREYS, Mrs. HELEN COTTER.

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1998            Principal    Mr. Bryce Easton
                                   Miss A. Fairbrother     Pre-primary & years 1, 2
                                   Mrs. Noni Tenhave     Pre-primary & years 1, 2  Aide
                                   Mrs. E. Bell               Pre-primary & years 1, 2  Aide
                                   Mrs. Helen Cotter      Years 3, 4, 5, 6 & 7
                                   Mr. Bryce Easton      Years 3, 4, 5, 6 & 7

 

1998 Pre-Primary & Years 1, 2

Back Row (L-R):   TANIA GHILARDUCCI, ANTONIA FARANDA, MATHEW AGOSTINELLI, TIMOTHY SQUIRE.
 Middle Row (L-R):   CUAN ASHTON, AMBER CARTER, CLAYTON RAWLES, NEIL BINGLEY, MELISSA O'KEEFFE.
 Front Row (L-R):    TIARNE SQUIRE, MARISSA COTTER, VANESSA SALPIETRO, COURTNEY CROCKART, KATE BINGLEY.
 Teacher:    Miss ALISON FAIRBROTHER.
 Teachers Aides:    Mrs. NONI TENHAVE, Mrs. ELIZABETH BELL.

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1998 Years 3, 4, 5, 6 & 7

Back Row (L-R):   EMMA WINCHCOMBE, FRANCESCA FERRARO, REBEKA DOETSCH, HEIDI DOETSCH, JESSICA FARANDA, ASHLEY RUCK.
 Middle Row (L-R):   SHELDON RUCK, SCOTT CAMPBELL, NATHAN SQUIRE, GRANT MORAS, JASMINE SQUIRE, SHARN ASHTON.
 Front Row (L-R):  LEIGHTON COTTER, DANIEL AGOSTINELLI, CAMERON RUCK, ALEX THATCHER, MARK BINGLEY.
 Absentees:    MICHAEL RARANDA, SCOTT BELL.
 Teachers:    Mr. BRYCE EASTON (Principal), Mrs. HELEN COTTER.

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1998 STAFF

(L-R):     Mrs. HELEN COTTER, Miss ALISON FAIRBROTHER, Mr BRYCE EASTON (Principal), Mrs. NONI TENHAVE, Mrs. ELIABETH BELL.
 Absentee:   Mrs. PENNY ROGAN, Mrs. CLAUDIA CHAPMAN.

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1999            Principal   Mr. Bryce Easton
                                   Miss Alison Fairbrother       Junior
                                   Mrs. Noni Tenhave            Junior    Assistant
                                   Mrs. Elizabeth Bell            Junior    Assistant
                                   Miss Rachael Della Franca  Junior  Trainee
                                   Mrs. Helen Cotter             Senior

 

1999 JUNIOR

Back Row (L-R):   TANIA GHILARDUCCI, CLAYTON RAWLES, ANTONIA FARANDA, LUKE ORAMS, MELISSA O'KEEFFE.
 Middle Row (L-R):   BRADLEY ORAMS, LACHLAN CARTER, NEIL BINGLEY, BRETT O'MEAGHER, ALEX MILLER, JAMES SQUIRE.
 Front Row (L-R):    DAPHNE BALLARD, SARAH O'KEEFFE, AMBER CARTER, MARISSA COTTER, TIARNE SQUIRE, KATE BINGLEY, JESSICA RUCK.
 Teacher:    Miss ALISON FAIRBROTHER.
 Teacher's Assistants:   Mrs. NONI TENHAVE &  Mrs. ELIZABETH BELL.
 Trainee:     Miss RACHAEL DELLA FRANCA.

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1999 SENIOR

Back Row (L-R):   NATHAN SQUIRE, JESSICA FARANDA, HEIDI  DOETSCH, ASHLEY RUCK.
 Middle Row (L-R):   TIMOTHY SQUIRE, MICHAEL FARANDA, SCOTT CAMPBELL, SCOTT BELL, MARK BINGLEY.
 Front Row (L-R):   WILLIAM MILLER, SHELDON RUCK, JASMINE SQUIRE, BROOKE ORAMS, CAMERON RUCK, LEIGHTON COTTER.
 Teachers:    Mr. BRYCE EASTON (Principal) & Mrs. HELEN COTTER.

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

1999 STAFF

Back Row (L-R):   Miss RACHAEL DELLA FRANCA, Mrs. NONI TENHAVE, Miss ALISON FAIRBROTHER, Mrs. ELIZABETH BELL.
 Front Row (L-R):   Mrs. PENNY ROGAN, Mr. BRYCE EASTON (Principal), Mrs. HELEN COTTER.

(Photo used with permission of the City of Armadale Birtwistle Local Studies Library)

 

BACK TO KARRAGULLEN DAY 1999

"OLD SCHOOL BOYS"  TAKEN OUTSIDE KARRAGULLEN HALL

 L - R:   JACK O'MEAGHER, WILFRED PRICE, KEN SMAILES,
 JOHN HANBURY, VERN BETTENAY.   #12

 

"OLD SCHOOL BOYS"  TAKEN OUTSIDE KARRAGULLEN HALL

 L - R:   JACK O'MEAGHER, WILFRED PRICE, KEN SMAILES, JOHN HANBURY, VERN BETTENAY.   #26

 

 #32

 

 

 

BELOW ARE TWO ARTICLES PRINTED IN THE "ROLEYSTONE COURIER" ABOUT THE CLOSING OF THE KARRAGULLEN PRIMARY SCHOOL IN 1999.

 

KARRAGULLEN SCHOOL CLOSES

"Karragullen Primary School closed the end of last year and its students will amalgamate with students at Roleystone's primary and secondary Government schools this year, giving them greater education opportunities and choices."
Education Minister Colin Barnett said the move would increase curriculum choice for students, give them greater access to specialist teaching staff and also to additional educational resources, particularly information technology.
With enrolments falling at Karragullen Primary School over the past five years, from 91 students in 1995 to 29 students this year, educational opportunities were limited.
Mr. Barnett acknowledged the efforts dedicated towards the LAEP process by staff and parents, and the strong support of the local school communities.
"Karragullen Primary School has had quite low enrolments for some time, particularly from children local to the area, and with such small student numbers, it's difficult to provide a wide range of learning environments and education opportunities that suit all ages," he said. "For example, there were limited opportunities for Karragullen Primary School students of a similar age to interact with each other, so moving together onto one site will increase this type of necessary social and educational interaction.
Karragullen students in kindergarten to year five next year would be able to attend Roleystone Primary School, while students in years six and seven would have an opportunity to attend Roleystone District High School which caters for students up to year 10.
Parents would have a choice to send their children to other local primary schools including Lesmurdie, Kelmscott and Pickering Brook.
The principals of Karragullen and Roleystone primary schools, and Roleystone District High School, would work with District Director Keith Newton to assist the Karragullen students with their move to their new schools.
There would be transport assistance available for students who lived more than 4.5 km from their nearest school.
Parents of all students enrolled last year in kindergarten to year six at Karragullen Primary School would receive a $200 relocation allowance to assist them with their child's enrolment at any other Government primary school this year.

 

A PERSONAL VIEW

Sadly Karragullen Primary School has come to an end, but I would like to mention my past association with the school and reflect back on the wonderful benefits that I have gained personally.
I have been a teacher Assistant at the Primary School since 1981 and have seen many Pre Primary's develop into individual responsible students. Also having observed their progression through the years, has given me a great feeling of satisfaction and my position always came with rewards.
"Mrs Tenhave you are a very special person to me because you have known me and I have known you for eight long years." From Michael.
The uniqueness of small class sizes, individual attention and the warmth of teachers have given so many a great start in life, my sympathy goes to the parents who have many difficult decisions to make and must feel the loss of the community spirit.

N. Tenhave, Karragullen 

 

#30

ON BEING A KARRA KID

Taken from the memories of Vern Bettenay. Born on October 29th 1922 and educated at Karragullen school (until he left school to work on the farm at the end of year 7). Vern has lived all of his life in Karragullen and still lives and works on the family orchard at ‘Irymple’ on Irymple road.

 

The Karragullen School Mutiny

I first toddled off to school in June 1928. My big Brother Bill had already been there for two years and I suppose I had all of the same fears and excitement that any other kid has when first starting school. It was a 2 and a half mile walk (over 5 kilometre) along a windy gravel road and there were no houses in between.  For a little boy who was yet to turn 6 this was a long and frightening walk. It took over an hour before we would get to the ‘little school on the rise’, the old KarragullenPrimary school.

If we were extremely lucky there was a chance of a ride from one of the timber men – Mr Wayman, Saunders, Smith or Sid Hudson. If so we would clamber up on top of the logs and bounce along the road feeling very proud of ourselves. The Kalumunda butcher would sometimes stop in the afternoon but he would only ever take the girls!  

The school was just one large room with a half covered porch leading to the front door. On the south side there were three large windows and there was one on the north side. There was a raised teacher’s desk on the western wall with the teachers table with a picture on the wall entitled ‘Stag at Bay’ and in the south western corner there was a fireplace. It’s funny how you remember so clearly a scene from so long ago. For the first two and a half years we had rows of benches with no back rests and a shelf in the desk with ink wells sunk into the wood. For my first year I used a slate and I recall being intrigued that this could so easily be written on and so easily obliterated.

I started school with Mr Johnson however he went on leave after only three weeks and he was replaced by My Brookhouse. This is when the fun began.

Mr Brookhouse quickly lost control of the school. The big boys soon took control of the class (they were in primary school but were tipping 14 years old). They cut the cane up in three pieces and there was absolute chaos. The next morning the big boys decided that we would all ‘go on a picnic’. The whole school traipsed off to Millstone rock. This was far more fun than lessons!  The next day we went off to Slippery Rocks (now known as Stinton Cascades.) I knew this was wrong but I was far more worried about the big boys’ (acka Jackie O’Mahar and Ken Smailes) than I was of the weak teacher!

The parents go to hear of it on the third day and the school was closed.

After a few days we heard that a new teacher was coming. There was great boasting by the big boys that we would soon have the new teacher beaten. The great day arrived and the school bell went. The younger ones (including yours truly) lined up very fast but the older boys were very unruly. Mr Oliver looked at the rabble sternly. He was over six foot tall and had flaming red hair and a pipe stuck out of the corner of his mouth.  His opening words, delivered in a bellow, were “I BELIEVE THE LAST TEACHER HAD A LITTLE BIT OF TROUBLE”. This was delivered while smacking his cane on the leg of his trousers. One of the ‘Big Boys’ let out a badly timed remark and he was dealt a smack around the backside that would have felled an ox! Karragullen school was under total control again. We all received the cane over the next few days and order was restored. And so ended the great revolt of Karragullen school. Perhaps the only time the whole school population has chosen to mutiny and go on a picnic rather than go to school.  

 

 

The Long Walk Home

Karragullen School had a mountain tribe and a valley tribe. You were ascribed a grouping based on whether you left school and went down the hill then you were a ‘valley’ and if you went up, you were a ‘mountain’. Bettenays were ‘Valley’ as were the Mahers, Hanburys, Laveracks, Saunders, Weymans and Scaris. The Mountain group consisted of the Hudsons, Smailes, Stintons and Simpsons.

At 3.15 the long walk home begun and we all went off up hill or down valley yelling final comments to each other as we went. We had nearly 5 kilometres to walk – and that is if we went straight home. And we never did…….

If we were not lucky enough to get a ride on top of the log truck a detour at the bottom of Gardiner’s Hill was common especially on hot days. This meant turning down to the creek (on what is now the Civas property). Here the local kids had built the wonderful ‘Mahers-hanbury’ pool. Sandbags had been placed across the creek and had pooled about 20 feet of water. I guess that is where I learnt to swim.

Tommy Maher had constructed a canoe from galvanized iron, a dump end at the stern and a rivet at the bow. It leaked a lot and was more often on the bottom. Swimming was much easier when it sank.

Barring a detour to this magical pool, Jobby’s Creek was also a favourite stopping off point. The creek ran very well at this stage. There were no pumps taking out volumes of water to water the orchard trees then. The gilgies in the creek were often red – as though they had been cooked. This is thought to be the origin of the term Red Gulley (Karra Gullen in the local Noonga language).

From Jobby’s creek the next stopping off point was the big red gum tree that had fallen over in a bad storm taking with it a ton or so of rich clay. As a school boy I would often gouge my initials in it and they were still there when I left school. The tree’s remnants are still there nearly 80 years on but the clay and my initials have long gone…

From there it was on to ‘The Mill’ – Bettenay’s Spot Mill to play highjinks on the mill sawdust heap. Often we would go from there to Death Adder Stump. This was named after we found a death adder there and being very brave boys we decided to stone it to death! With rocks.  Now our aim wasn’t too good, snake skin is tough and the rocks were just not up to scratch. The result was a very ferocious snake. Our terrified shrieks attracted my dad who was luckily working in the mill nearby. He raced over fearing a disaster and killed the poor snake – putting it out of its misery and saving us in the process.  This was where the Mahars turned off onto their home track. The long walk home was often through the bush where we were often able to sample all types of bush treats. The prized dogberry bushes, snotty gobble, Quandongs and wild plum all had fruit worth sampling. Our sense of direction was canny and we could always find our way home through the bush. But perhaps the orientation wasn’t as accurate as we thought. I always remember my big brother Bill pointing to a big pole on the horizon to the south of the property and saying to me ‘See that big pole – that’s the South Pole. ….. But don’t tell mum!’

 

Never Tell a Lie

Our teacher Mr Oliver was very stern and he used the cane regularly for breaking any of his rules. His rules were simple:

* No swearing,

* No climbing trees,

* No being outside the school fence without permission

* No carelessness.

 

About six months after starting school I got the cane for the first time – I would have just turned 6.  Four little snowy haired boys were playing chasey: Billy Maher, John Hudson Len Simpson and myself. To take the turn a little bit faster I rolled over a limb of a tree and of course it snapped.  Little boys went everywhere! Of course this was one of the main rules and we all knew there would be trouble!

The bell went and Mr Olver asked sternly: ‘Who did it’ – while menacingly tapping his leg with the cane. There was absolute silence. I was petrified. One of the older girls piped up and said she saw it and it was Johnny Hudson. Johnny was brought to the front protesting his innocence but to no avail. ‘Hold out your hand son’ was the stern command as the teacher lifted his cane. And then guilt overcame and I stuttered ‘Please sir it wasn’t him, it was me.’ The truth didn’t save me and I received two strokes of the cane.

At playtime Mr Oliver said ‘Vernon stay behind’. This rocked me as I felt that I had already had my punishment but thought there was more to come. The teacher then said to me: ‘That was the punishment for climbing trees but you can be very proud of yourself, you told the truth’. I can’t say I felt very good about it all but perhaps my reward came some years later…….

One morning on my second last year Mrs Smith came to the school very angry and accused me of stealing her watermelons. I knew I was completely innocent because it was my turn to ride the bike to school (there was only one, shared between the family of five). I had been nowhere near her house. Mr Oliver asked me and I strongly protested that I had not touched her melons.  Mr Oliver listened to her and then he said:‘if Vernon said he didn’t steal your melons then he did not. Vernon tells the truth’. Mrs Smith was furious but I felt very proud. I suppose from this time onwards I have known that the truth works.

But this didn’t mean I was the teacher’s pet – far from it. One day we were doing Copy Book Writing. The day’s text was ‘Canberra the Capital of the Commonwealth’. I put a lot of effort into my work. I seriously expected to get a Good or a Very Good. Instead I got a whack with the cane and told to do it again. I did not have a clue what was wrong until Mr Oliver told me to check my spelling. I had spelt Commonwealth six times with only one ‘m’. This was an automatic one stroke of the cane for carelessness.

Mr Oliver was the only teacher I had over my years at Karragullen school and it wasn’t all bad. He was a very educated man and really tried to get us to value education.  He had a great influence on me and I look back at how hard his job was, an isolated teacher in a very remote school with a mass of headstrong country kids who didn’t care much for being in school.  He put on some excellent school concerts and was very innovative with the Manual Arts classes. He taught us to use local bush trees to make items of furniture, rustic chairs and benches. He was very important in my school life and I thank him for what he did for us.

 

 

A Few Lasting Memories

A clear memory of my early school days was when we were all taken outside to see the first aeroplane fly over. It looked amazing to us. Very little work was achieved that day! On another day we were out at play when suddenly there was a tremendous noise of whips cracking. We then saw the Hanbury boys and a few other local riders bringing in a mob of Brumbies. They were coming in from the Beverley Roaduntil they reached the school and then they raced them across the rocks outside the school fence to turn them south towards the stockyard. This was real ‘Man from Snowy River’ stuff. We were allowed to stay outside to watch but had very strict orders to stay inside the fence.

Karragullen school had many characters. One big boy, who I was intimidated by as a young lad but whom I grew up to have immense respect for as a gentleman, was Ken Smailes. He told me when we were both octogenarians that he: ‘had plotted to burn the school down once and that the scorch marks had been there for all to see until the school was demolished in 2002’. He also admitted that he often used to take his rifle to school so that he could hunt kangaroos on the way home. ‘I didn’t think at the time that I was a delinquent’ he said thoughtfully ‘but I suppose by today’s standards this is just what I was. The times were just different I suppose.’

Karragullen from very early times attracted a range of nationalities and in the 1930’s Italians and Slavs started to appear in greater numbers. Their kids often came to school speaking little or no English. Mr Oliver helped many of the Italian immigrants (children and their parents) to speak English and many owe him a huge debt of gratitude for his helping hand in their new land. They must have had a very difficult time of it at first but I always remember that they learnt to swear very quickly! I remember when one new arrival was having a fight with my brother Bill. He was overpowered and lost his temper completely as he ran from the school yard. He ran all the way home yelling: ‘You just wait ‘til Mussolini comes. Just you wait. He’ll get you.’

One of our successful enterprises was to carry a fire with us on the many frosty mornings when we traveled to school. It was Tommy Maher’s idea and it consisted of a fire lit in a bucket which we stoked well with honkey nuts and blackboys. This was strung on a pole with two kids carrying the pole and the rest of the mob running along side enjoying the warmth (and the smoke)! A second generation of our own children used to light a fire on frosty mornings at the school bus stop (in the old Pee Tree on Brookton Hwy). Our parents had a practical solution to fire safety in those days. Each spring when our dads agreed the bush was overgrown, they would choose a day and would give us each a box of matches. Our instructions were simple ‘light up every blackboy you see on the way home from school’.  This was the best fun and the undergrowth was very successfully managed. Of course the rules were very plain. On any other day no matches were allowed if the grass was dry. We were very aware of the dangers of bush fire.

Slippery Rocks – now named Stinton Park Cascades, was a much loved spot for all the Karra kids. We often detoured to this magic spot. The water flows down the rocks over about 30 metres ending in a steep decline. A black algae grows on the rock making it amazingly slippery and going down it you can reach great speeds. We blocked off the bottom to make sure we had a soft watery landing. Many a pair of trousers were totally ruined from sliding down the slopes. We also admired the beautiful wild bush orchids and flowers and it is great to see that this is now a protected nature reserve.

Now I look back on my days at the little bush school and I feel it was a lot of fun and I wouldn’t have missed it for quids.

 

TANIA AND HER DAD ERIC GHILARDUCCI PICTURED IN THE PLAYGROUND OF THE FINAL KARRAGULLEN SCHOOL MAY 2010
 (Photo and article kindly supplied by courtesy of Roleystone Courier) 

 

FAMILY REMEMBERS

Another family with strong links to the school are the Ghilarducci's of Karragullen. Tania was in Year 2 when the school finally closed and she recalls how devastated she was "It was a really good school, small but really caring. I really didn't want to move to Roleystone". she recalls.

Tania's dad Eric Ghilarducci went to the Karragullen School at the Rock Inne site and recalled that he only really liked the sports, He remembered some great pranks like burning plasticine in the fireplace.

All 5 of Tania's brothers and sisters went to the school and her grandmother Millie Travacich went to the Pickering Brook School in the 1930's.

KARRAGULLEN SCHOOL DAYS By David Laverack

The name is of aboriginal origin and means Red Gully (karra - red, gullen - gully).

The school was originally situated near the Illawarra Orchard gate but in 1920 was moved to Brookton Highway adjacent to where the Rock Inn now stands. A school house was also erected. The buildings were weatherboard and iron and had fireplaces for winter fires. A tennis court was put nearby and was made of white ant nests which made a good surface.

As my birthday is on 5th February I would have been just 6 years old when I started school in 1923. My sister Clare would have accompanied me and I would have been well dressed with a shady hat and black leather boots. The distance to the school was nearly 2 miles along gravel roads and bush tracks. We may have walked with Lionel and Roma Stinton who lived nearby.

My teacher in infants was a young Doris Bettenay, a local girl from Roleystone who rode to school on a horse. She only taught for 2 years as she was retrenched owing to the lack of numbers of pupils. The headmistress was Mrs. Agnes Ethel Pine, a lady of nearly 60 years whose posting was her last before retirement. She taught in 1923 - 24 - 25. She was a very patriotic person and the school had a flagpole and the flag was raised each morning and lowered when school finished. We all saluted it and afterwards, in class, repeated the Lord's Prayer just before starting lessons. Mrs. Pine was a very hard working, conscientious teacher and controlled the class well and used the cane when necessary. She was replaced by Cecil J. Johnston who taught for the remaining years apart from sometime in 1928.

He was transferred from Walkaway and he went on long service leave from June 1923 and was replaced by a relieving teacher, a Mr. Brookhouse. This elderly gentleman rode his pushbike all the way (15 miles) from Maida Vale but later bought a "T" Model Ford, which gave him no end of trouble. Unfortunately he had no control whatsoever over the class and the boys gave him absolute hell. If he arrived late all the boys would ring the bell and a stack of books would fall on his head as he walked in the door. That would be one of the milder pranks played on him. We called him "chooky" and we never learnt too much during his reign. I remember riding my bike into Karragullen one day to buy him a couple of Lodge Spark Plugs for his car. He later broke his wrist trying to crank his car so he resigned from his teaching role.

So from 1st October until the end of the year we had an 18 year old Miss Wells, straight from Training College. She arrived with a bundle of canes (so we thought) and soon had every class well and truly under her control. Then from the beginning of 1929 Mr. Johnston who had returned from long service leave, took over for the rest of my school days at Karragullen. He was a fairly strict but good teacher.

One day he tried to teach us singing but eventually gave it up. He held a tuning fork on the piano (yes, the school had its own piano) and tried to get a harmonious note from everyone. I can remember looking around the class at a lot of bare-footed, some raggedly dressed, kids, with the teacher trying to get a note of music out of them (and this included me). He was not in the race!

However, he did have a manual class and as young as I was he did teach me a bit about tin-smithing and soldering. This was right up my ally. One Arbor Day we had a ceremony and planted some trees and one of the large pine trees now growing near the school grounds would have been planted by me.

The boy’s toilet was at the end of the yard and some bamboos were growing by the entrance. One day when I was walking (probably running!) towards it, a lad in front of me pushed a bamboo away from in front of him and it switched back and hit me on the temple. Apart from hurting it caused a big bump to form immediately and it never went away. It was not sore and eventually my father took me to a doctor in Perth and had it removed.

At the end of the school year in 1926 I was awarded the R. S. Sampson prize for the year's best performance. It was a leather bound copy of Dickens’s "Martin Chuzzlewit" which I still have. Mr. Sampson was the local Member of Parliament for the Darling Range Electorate. I thought he was a great fellow.

Sometime during the year we were driven to King's Park and I remember sitting on the kerbstone waiting to see the visiting Duke and Duchess of York drive past. They had arrived on the battleship H. M. S. Hood, escorted by H. M. S. Renown and Repulse. A lot of country schoolchildren were given the same opportunity and the outing would have been arranged by the Education Department.

I have a photo of all the school children taken at the school in 1926 with everybody’s name attached. There were 32 students in the photo but unfortunately the teacher was not included. It is only an enlarged black and white Brownie snap but to me it is quite historic. The Kalamunda and Armadale Historical Societies both have a copy.

Several Karragullen lads are worthy of mention. Lionel Stinton won a scholarship to Modern School where he later became head boy and also went on to get the highest aggregate for his Leaving Exam result and so win him a cadetship become a dentist. This was given by Mr. Ambrose Cummins, himself an old Modern School boy - the school had just had its 21st Birthday - hence the cadetships offered. There was no dental school in W. A. in these days. Another boy was Pal Smailes who left school as soon as he could to help his father on the orchard. He eventually joined the army and suffered terribly when he was a commando in Timor. After he was discharged and regained his health he attended the School of Mines in Kalgoorlie and became a mining engineer. A case of dormant talent eventually coming to the fore. Ken Smailes joined the Navy and Monty, the air force and all three boys returned.

Ken practiced as a Ferrier on Brookton Highway, Karragullen and Monty was in the mining industry in Canada, where he married. During the last couple of years at the Karragullen School there were only 2 boys in my class - Bob Abbott and me. We were good friends. I think Mr. Johnston taught me well as I eventually made the grade at Fremantle Boys School. By the way Mr. Johnston's annual salary was 350 pounds less 26 pounds for rent! A Mr. Oliver, a married teacher, replaced Mr. Johnston in 1930.

 

Articles:           James "Pal" Smailes
                      Ken Smailes
                      Pickering Brook Heritage Group
                      Roleystone Courier
                      Vern Bettenay
                      David Laverack

Images:         1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10    Tom Price
                     11     unknown
                     12     Margaret Bettenay    
                     7, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 19     Anna Vincenti
                     18      Viola Biagioni
                     20      Steve Putland
                     21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 29    Stephanie O'Meagher
                     28 , 31     Gretchen Forrest
                     30      Roleystone Courier
                     32      David Laverack
                     33      Shirley Bishop

   

 

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